Woody Allen: A Documentary

Woody Allen: A Documentary

A Documentary of Woody Allen, featuring archive footage and interviews. 3.6 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
Woody Allen: A Documentary

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Documentary
Director Robert B Weide
Cast Diane Keaton, Owen Wilson, Martin Scorsese, Letty Aronson Woody Allen
Studio PBS
Release Date June 2012
Running Time 113 mins
 

A Documentary of Woody Allen, featuring archive footage and interviews.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Films about film-makers are not always so entertaining, but this one about a man who never brags and views any praise with a rheumy eye is a pleasure.

08/06/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

I could have watched this armada forever. The clips alone, from Sleeper, Annie Hall, Zelig and others, pageant his greatness. There are also the early stand-up vignettes, hysterically funny even though Allen insists he hated going on stage. Diane Keaton and Mariel Hemingway testify to the treats and torments of being a Woody muse. “He was short and he was cute” is how Keaton explains the enigma of falling in love with a nerdy-looking nebbish. He made her laugh too. He would. There surely wasn’t a funnier man in the whole last century.

08/06/2012

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Does a good job of justifying why Allen continues to matter without whitewashing his story.

07/06/2012

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

The box-office success of ‘Midnight in Paris’ lets the film end on a high – even if Owen Wilson puts that down to having ‘Paris’ in the title.

06/06/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

For Allen fans, this is a nostalgic tour of his days of glory, those moments of raw wit and philosophical depth that some of his later films, like Match Point, lack. There is also some screamingly funny footage from his early comedies such as Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex ... and Bananas.

08/06/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

"Having a long career is not the achievement I’ve been going for,” explains Woody Allen at the start of this amiable career retrospective. “I’m still trying to make a great film, which has eluded me over the years.” Given what follows, this is evidently a load of rubbish: Allen has made many great films.

07/06/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

There can't be a life story in postwar American cinema more inspiring than his: the comic genius who started out as a gag-writer for the newspapers, then a standup, and then a film-maker who insisted on auteur prerogative without ever needing to use the word, and who became an evangelist for the masters of European cinema.

08/06/2012

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The Independent

Geoffrey MacNab

The film-maker is fearful of intruding too far into his subject's private life. The telling throwaway details about Allen that Weide has given in interviews don't make it into the documentary. Concentrating on the work is Weide's excuse for not delving in unseemly fashion into his private life. The paradox, of course, is that this informs the work. It's not just tittle-tattle and gossip. Such material helps us understand the motivations of the artist.

08/06/2012

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