Oranges and Sunshine

Oranges and Sunshine

Oranges & Sunshine tells the story of Margaret Humphreys (Emily Watson), a social worker from Nottingham, who uncovered one of the most significant social scandals in recent times: the organised deportation of children in care from the United Kingdom to Australia. 3.0 out of 5 based on 12 reviews
Oranges and Sunshine

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Drama
Director Jim Loach
Cast David Wenham, Hugo Weaving Emily Watson
Studio Icon Film
Release Date April 2011
Running Time 100 mins
 

Oranges & Sunshine tells the story of Margaret Humphreys (Emily Watson), a social worker from Nottingham, who uncovered one of the most significant social scandals in recent times: the organised deportation of children in care from the United Kingdom to Australia.

Reviews

The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

This is a film that would be just as effective on television, and it’s probably too low-key and depressing to be a hit. The thrillerish aspects — menacing phone-calls, sinister priests — aren’t followed through. And it begs more questions than it answers about the abusers and government policy. All the same, this is a moving, thoughtful, grown-up film that’s a genuine eye-opener.

01/04/2011

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

Loach has made a film uncluttered by an obvious director’s stamp, peopled by sympathetic characters and driven by a desire to say something about the world without losing sight of human experience. In casting Watson, he’s also secured a performance that boldly lacks vanity while exuding a strength that leads you confidently through difficult, troubling terrain.

31/03/2011

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Variety

Richard Kuipers

Auds may well be in tears just minutes into "Oranges and Sunshine," a deeply moving study of emotionally scarred adults who were illegally deported as children to Australia from Britain in the 1940s and '50s. Toplining a superb Emily Watson...

10/10/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

...a powerful, deeply moving, understated account of a major social injustice...

03/04/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

With this kind of solid, competently no-frills film-making, the emphasis falls automatically on to the script and the performances. But while the latter are mostly first-rate, the screenplay is less confident.

01/04/2011

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Total Film

Neil Smith

It’s a shocking saga to be sure. Yet it doesn’t quite translate as compelling drama, loach and scripter Rona Munro seeming cowed by the scale of the scandal and their terror of exploiting it.

18/03/2011

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Empire Magazine

David Hughes

In less sensitive hands, Oranges And Sunshine might have been the cinematic equivalent of misery-lit. Instead, it has a quiet power, but in its studious avoidance of melodrama, it’s almost too low key for its own good.

01/04/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Jim Loach's sombre, painful film packs a hard punch; harder than you'd expect from the soft-focus poster.

31/03/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Cinematically, though, the film doesn't really work, dependent on undramatic scenes of Watson furrowing her brow over paperwork or facing down objections to her dirt-digging campaign.

01/04/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Oranges and Sunshine is a plodding, drab-looking chore which has facts and figures in place of dialogue, and plotlines which suggest, meekly, that they might be quite exciting, before they tiptoe away, never to be seen again.

03/04/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Yet the film’s brisk steps from one emotional flash point to another become monotonous. The facts of how parents and offspring are reunited are largely omitted, and a parent who in one scene is said to be untraceable appears a couple of scenes later.

03/04/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Emily Watson gives the only believable performance in a film beset by clunky dialogue and torpid mise-en-scène.

30/01/2011

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