Sarah's Key

Sarah's Key

Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten-year old girl, is taken with her parents by the French police as they go door-to-door arresting Jewish families in the middle of the night. Desperate to protect her younger brother, Sarah locks him in a bedroom cupboard – their secret hiding place – and promises to come back for him as soon as they are released. Sixty seven years later: Sarah’s story intertwines with that of Julia Jarmond (Kristin Scott Thomas), an American journalist investigating the roundup. In her research, Julia stumbles onto a trail of secrets that link her to Sarah, and to questions about her own romantic future. 2.8 out of 5 based on 12 reviews
Sarah's Key

Omniscore:

Certificate 12
Genre Drama
Director Gilles Paquet-Brenner
Cast Mayance, Niels Arestrup Kristin Scott Thomas
Studio Studio 37
Release Date August 2011
Running Time 110 mins
 

Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten-year old girl, is taken with her parents by the French police as they go door-to-door arresting Jewish families in the middle of the night. Desperate to protect her younger brother, Sarah locks him in a bedroom cupboard – their secret hiding place – and promises to come back for him as soon as they are released. Sixty seven years later: Sarah’s story intertwines with that of Julia Jarmond (Kristin Scott Thomas), an American journalist investigating the roundup. In her research, Julia stumbles onto a trail of secrets that link her to Sarah, and to questions about her own romantic future.

Reviews

The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

The flashbacks are so much more powerful than the present-day story that the film does feel broken-backed.

05/08/2011

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The New York Times

Rachel Saltz

The environment is so luminous that every outdoor shot has an aura of magical realism.

10/08/2011

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

Scott Thomas is tremendous, though; the emotional detail of her performance is never less than gripping, even as the film falters.

08/04/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

The subject matter is fascinating: the Germans have a word for coming to terms with the past — Vergangenheitsbewältigung — but the French are still unearthing theirs in stories like this.

08/05/2011

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Empire Magazine

Angie Errigo

The historical drama is more compelling than the contrived modern-day doings, but for a classy Scott Thomas striking a deft balance between distress and resolve.

10/08/2011

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Sarah's Key is directed with some sensitivity but seldom catches fire, and Scott Thomas is left adrift in a part that doesn't quite match her abilities.

08/05/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradsh

The first two acts of Sarah's Key, which disclose the connection between past and present, and the gruesome outcome of Sarah's desperate return to her Paris apartment, certainly move along at a rattling pace. The problem is in the modern day... things get a bit TV movie-ish

08/04/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

The historical situations have enough impact to overcome the at times sentimental contrivance of the contemporary material.

10/08/2011

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

... respectful if didactic ...

08/01/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Weak, sprawling and pedagogic

08/04/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

... a sort of dramatised version of Who Do You Think You Are?

07/08/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The screenplay, shuttling between timeframes, grows more accommodating of cliche as it proceeds, and deathbed revelations start to pile up obtrusively as Scott Thomas pursues her story from Paris to Brooklyn

08/05/2011

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