Tyrannosaur

Tyrannosaur

The debut feature film from award winning actor Paddy Considine Joseph, a man plagued by violence and a rage that is driving him to self-destruction, is spiraling into turmoil. A chance of redemption appears in the form of Hannah, a Christian charity shop worker. Their relationship develops to reveal that Hannah is hiding a secret of her own, a secret with devastating consequences for both of them. 3.3 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Tyrannosaur

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Paddy Considine
Cast Olivia Colman, Eddie Marsan, Paul Popplewell, Ned Dennehy Peter Mullan
Studio Optimum
Release Date October 2011
Running Time 91 mins
 

The debut feature film from award winning actor Paddy Considine Joseph, a man plagued by violence and a rage that is driving him to self-destruction, is spiraling into turmoil. A chance of redemption appears in the form of Hannah, a Christian charity shop worker. Their relationship develops to reveal that Hannah is hiding a secret of her own, a secret with devastating consequences for both of them.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

...as gripping as any hardboiled thriller, delivering emotional content that’ll stay with you for a long time.

03/10/2011

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The Evening Standard

David Sexton

It's art, not fun, be warned.

07/10/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

...it's a visceral, considered dissection of abuse and rage and the dysfunctional relationships that rage creates, which, in turn, perpetuate that rage, and an examination of people who create their own eco-system of anger and unhappiness. The performances of Mullan, Colman and Marsan are excellent and create a compelling human drama.

06/10/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

...here's an unapologetically downbeat British film, and one that feels absolutely for real.

09/10/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

Tyrannosaur is a fearsome debut but it’s subtler than the title suggests — and the film’s uplifting moments make it easier to recommend than the average British misery flick.

06/10/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

...as compassionate as it is brutal.

07/10/2011

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Total Film

Matt Mueller

Considine not only plays magpie with Meadows but demonstrates Leigh’s flair for pricking middle-class pomposity and Loach’s unflinching eye for the grim realities of social deprivation. It’s a mighty debut with more than one stinging surprise in store.

23/09/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

Olivia Colman and Peter Mullan are excellent as the orphans of this terrifying storm, and Eddie Marsan is frighteningly beyond the pale as the husband from, and on his way to, hell.

09/10/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

It's hard to watch at times, though made with an intensity and artfulness you never for a moment doubt.

07/10/2011

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The Financial Times

Antonia Quirke

Paddy Considine set himself a challenge in Tyrannosaur to make a drama that starts with a man kicking his pet dog to death, yet getting the audience to end up caring for him. And somehow he does

06/10/2011

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

[T]he cast is consistently stronger than the material, which comes close to sentimentalising suffering. Considine insists so fiercely on the preordained cruelty of working-class life that the audience would surely demand a refund if nothing horrific befell the chirpy young lad in Joseph's street.

06/10/2011

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Time Out

David Jenkins

The film says that a violent way of life is always punished, sometimes physically, always psychologically. It’s not a particularly deep or unique statement, but Considine howls it with sincerity and conviction.

06/10/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

For most of the film, the actors’ strong work forced back my suspicion that the story was overloaded. In the last few minutes, however, the plot gets seriously out of hand.

09/10/2011

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Considine builds the film around Joseph and Hannah’s mutual bond of helplessness and violence, but his overbearing instinct for crude melodrama – right down to the shirtless pitbull-owner whose presence facilitates an entirely phony finale – undercuts anything honest and true in the performances.

07/10/2011

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

With realism the dour, it ceases to be realistic.

06/10/2011

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