Four

Four

The plan: Kidnap your wife's lover. Take him to a remote warehouse. Hurt him a little. Scare him a lot. Keep your hands clean - hire a detective for the dirty work. Simple? There's no such thing as simple. 2.2 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Four

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director John Langridge
Cast Craig Conway, Sean Pertwee, Kierston Wareing Martin Compston
Studio Miracle Comms
Release Date October 2011
Running Time 85 mins
 

The plan: Kidnap your wife's lover. Take him to a remote warehouse. Hurt him a little. Scare him a lot. Keep your hands clean - hire a detective for the dirty work. Simple? There's no such thing as simple.

Reviews

Total Film

Paul Bradshaw

With just four actors, a single setting and more twists than a bag full of pretzels, John Langridge’s grimy lo-fi debut is almost smart, taut and nasty enough to bid for the Tarantino comparisons he’s obviously after.

19/10/2011

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Four, which starts as an offbeat thriller with psuedo-Pinterish dialogue, ends up much like a horror movie. Langridge and his cast produce atmosphere and tension - but it's over-ambitious and has an air of fantasy about it.

21/10/2011

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The Guardian

Henry Barnes

[A] sloppy kidnap drama.

20/10/2011

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The Independent

Antony Quin

Paul Chronnell's script meditates on male insecurity and possessiveness, though the attempt at menace unwisely borrows quotations from Hollywood movies that make it sound rather wannabe in consequence.

21/10/2011

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

The script is as uninspired as the plot, all muttered threats, cockernee slang and an initially amusing, increasingly wearying overuse of the F-word. But the cast make the best of it.

20/10/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

It all goes endlessly wrong in the deserted factory, as Sean Pertwee, Kierston Wareing and Craig Conway do their best with some appallingly written dialogue.

21/10/2011

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The Sunday Times

Thom Gibbs

Much brutal pummelling and wearingly lengthy periods of shouting ensue. Executive-produced by Nina Wadia of EastEnders, the film has dialogue that would shame a below-average soap, not least the chauvinist rhetoric on unwelcome loan from the 1970s.

23/10/2011

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