The Future

The Future

Sophie and Jason are strange the way all couples are strange when they’re alone. They live in a small LA apartment, have jobs they hate, and in one month they’ll adopt a stray cat named Paw Paw. Like a newborn baby, he’ll need around-the-clock care – he may die in six months, or it may take five years. Despite their good intentions, Sophie and Jason are terrified of their looming loss of freedom. So with just one month left, they quit their jobs, and the Internet, to pursue their dreams ... Living in two terrifyingly vacant and different realities, Sophie and Jason must reunite with time, space and their own souls in order to come home. 2.5 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
The Future

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Drama
Director Miranda July
Cast Hamish Linklater, David Warshofsky, Isabella Acres Miranda July
Studio Picturehouses
Release Date November 2011
Running Time 91 mins
 

Sophie and Jason are strange the way all couples are strange when they’re alone. They live in a small LA apartment, have jobs they hate, and in one month they’ll adopt a stray cat named Paw Paw. Like a newborn baby, he’ll need around-the-clock care – he may die in six months, or it may take five years. Despite their good intentions, Sophie and Jason are terrified of their looming loss of freedom. So with just one month left, they quit their jobs, and the Internet, to pursue their dreams ... Living in two terrifyingly vacant and different realities, Sophie and Jason must reunite with time, space and their own souls in order to come home.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

David Hughes

As with her first film, July finds new things to say about human foibles, spoken in a fresh and distinctive voice (and many a memorable quote). This time, however, her observations and insights — sometimes petty, occasionally profound — are shot through with an icy shard of painful melancholia, particularly in the last 30 minutes, when the whimsy of the set-up gives way to a sucker punch of genuine feeling and truth.

31/10/2011

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

To appreciate The Future, Miranda July’s ingeniously constructed wonder cabinet of a movie, you may first have to pass through a stage of mild annoyance or even something more intense ... The first part of The Future seems, quite deliberately, to test the spectrum of audience response. Are you curious? Enchanted? Frustrated? All of the above?

28/07/2011

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Time Out

David Jenkins

Not a crowd-pleaser by any measure, but a mature, bold and recklessly inquisitive film, however unpleasant it is to consume in the moment.

01/11/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Michael Phillips

The film doesn't have much of a motor. But there's a lot to like, and to admire.

05/08/2011

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The New Yorker

Anthony Lane

The notion that both this movie and “Battle: Los Angeles” could come out of the same place, in the same year, is a startling tribute to the city.

04/11/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

There is an extraordinary fingernails-down-the-blackboard-up-to-11 quality here ... But I admit to seeing a deliberate point to it: partly satirical, partly an exercise in pop art amplification. What Jeff Koons does to banal objects, Miranda July does to banal situations, feelings, conversations. It's a kind of affectless sentimentalism, and a commentary on the nature of coupledom, its secular theology.

03/11/2011

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Total Film

Kevin Harley

How much kookiness can a film endure?

01/11/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The flag the director planted on the American indie hill with her first film has been knocked askew here. The Future looks anything but bright.

03/11/2011

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

You end up feeling sorry for the cat but not for Sophie and Jason, who seem unable to deal with life, love or, in fact, anything.

04/11/2011

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The Financial Times

Raphael Abraham

Writer-director July ... has layered on so much self-conscious whimsy – monologues from the cat, dialogues with the moon and other dashes of magical realism – that the central drama struggles to be heard.

03/11/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

The Future is narrated by an overweight, sick cat called Paw-Paw, with a voice so grating that you want to string him up ... [who] awaits adoption by two of the most pointless, self-absorbed and narcissistic creatures ever on screen.

04/11/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

It's parodic Sundance independent cinema – pure, aimless, triple-brewed whimsy.

06/11/2011

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The Sunday Times

Peter Whittle

It will be best appreciated by emotional anorexics.

06/11/2011

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