Oslo, August 31st

Oslo, August 31st

Anders will soon complete his drug rehabilitation in the countryside. As part of the program, he is allowed to go into the city for a job interview. But he takes advantage of the leave and stays on in the city, drifting around, meeting people he hasn't seen in a long while ... For the remainder of the day and long into the night, the ghosts of past mistakes will wrestle with the chance of love, the possibility of a new life and the hope to see some future by morning. 3.7 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
Oslo, August 31st

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Joachim Trier
Cast Anders Borchgrevink, Andreas Braaten, Hans Olav Brenner Anders Danielsen Lie
Studio Soda Pictures
Release Date November 2011
Running Time 95 mins
 

Anders will soon complete his drug rehabilitation in the countryside. As part of the program, he is allowed to go into the city for a job interview. But he takes advantage of the leave and stays on in the city, drifting around, meeting people he hasn't seen in a long while ... For the remainder of the day and long into the night, the ghosts of past mistakes will wrestle with the chance of love, the possibility of a new life and the hope to see some future by morning.

Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A very rewarding and worthwhile film.

03/11/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

A day in the life of a 34-year-old recovering drug addict might sound rebarbative, but under Joachim Trier's fluid and sympathetic direction it achieves something quite moving.

03/11/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Trier’s film takes us to some desperate places, but it earns that despair with clear eyes.

03/11/2011

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

This feels totally fresh and modern in its concerns. It’s also devastating.

01/11/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

Scandinavian nihilism at its best.

04/11/2011

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Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

It’s fair to say that all does not go smoothly, but Trier deftly avoids melodrama and Lie invests what could have been an unsympathetic role with humanity, humour and dignity.

31/10/2011

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

It will not be most people's idea of a feelgood evening in the cinema. However, it has such a great performance at its centre and is so well-made that it's worth the bleakness.

04/11/2011

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The Sunday Times

Jonathan Dean

The director, Joachim Trier, could reteach his relative Lars something about the power of subtle film-making.

06/11/2011

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The fictions of Oslo, August 31st – its picture of estranged sensibilities – feel at times like a subtle, prophetic warning of the real horror events that happened in Norway on July 24 2011.

03/11/2011

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Total Film

Philip Kemp

Patience is needed: the film follows its hero's own disaffected pace, and you see the ending coming a long way off.

02/11/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

It's a cold, detached, very Scandinavian film.

06/11/2011

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