Margaret

Margaret

A young woman witnesses a bus accident, and is caught up in the aftermath, where the question of whether or not it was intentional affects many people's lives. 3.8 out of 5 based on 13 reviews
Margaret

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Kenneth Lonergan
Cast Anna Paquin, J Smith-Cameron, Mark Ruffalo, Matt Damon Jean Reno
Studio Fox Searchlight
Release Date December 2011
Running Time 149 mins
 

A young woman witnesses a bus accident, and is caught up in the aftermath, where the question of whether or not it was intentional affects many people's lives.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

What a mesmerising movie this is. If Lonergan couldn’t cut it down, that is because it deserves four hours and will one day get it.

01/12/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Stunning: provocative and brilliant, a sprawling neurotic nightmare of urban catastrophe ... and rocket-fuelled by a superbly thin-skinned performance by Anna Paquin. Its sheer energy and dramatic vehemence, alongside that raw lead performance, puts it way ahead of more tastefully formed dramas.

01/12/2011

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Time Out

Keith Uhlich

This is frayed-edges filmmaking at its finest.

28/11/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

It’s a phoenix of a film, risen from the ashes of what looked alarmingly like failure, and it needs to be seen.

01/12/2011

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The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

A few years ago the world fell in love with another talky adolescent, Juno MacGuff. Lisa is in many ways the antithesis of Juno ... Nevertheless, she's a tremendous character: a rebel in search of a cause, a good girl whose bad behaviour, quite simply, rings true.

02/12/2011

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

The film has a few false notes ... but overall there’s a knotty realism to it that steadily enthrals.

04/12/2011

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It doesn’t always work — some scenes feel like confrontations engineered for dramatic impact rather than honesty. But there are a couple of scenes that are pretty much faultless: the first is an encounter on the street between Lisa and two of her teachers; the second is the film’s profoundly affecting climax at the opera.

02/12/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

If it's a failure, in that neither Lonergan nor its studio is happy with it, then I wish all failures were as richly rewarding. I wish all successes were as richly rewarding, too.

04/12/2011

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The Observer

Philip French

Poorly focused and Lonergan cannot have intended for his young heroine to be as insufferable and self-righteous as she appears ... It is nevertheless an intelligent, thoughtful film.

04/12/2011

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

For around 90 minutes, Margaret feels not like a standard American coming-of-age story, but like a French movie, more concerned with candor than with likability and driven less by the mechanisms of a plot than by a ranging, probing interest in personalities and relationships.

29/09/2011

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Time Magazine

Mary Pols

Lonergan didn't bite off more than he could chew with Margaret — this is his personal moral gymnasium — but he did bite off more than others might want to chew ... Margaret is slipping into theaters with little fanfare, but at least these great performances are seeing the light of day.

29/09/2011

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The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

It’s actually more interesting as a portrait of Lonergan’s protracted struggle to say something profound about a subject that’s too chaotic for his chosen medium.

02/12/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

If you're wondering who Margaret is, by the way, she's mentioned in a passing quotation from a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem. But you wouldn't be surprised if you heard she was a character who got lost in the movie's haphazard composition.

02/12/2011

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