Shame

Shame

Brandon is a 30-something man living comfortably in New York balancing a busy job and active social life. When the wayward Sissy, turns up at his apartment unannounced, Brandon's carefully managed lifestyle spirals out of control. 3.5 out of 5 based on 21 reviews
Shame

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Steve McQueen
Cast Carey Mulligan, James Badge Dale, Nicole Beharie Michael Fassbender
Studio Momentum Pictures
Release Date January 2012
Running Time 101 mins
 

Brandon is a 30-something man living comfortably in New York balancing a busy job and active social life. When the wayward Sissy, turns up at his apartment unannounced, Brandon's carefully managed lifestyle spirals out of control.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

It’s wonderful to have a film with so little explanation. Shame, like McQueen’s Hunger, is an enriched form of the enigma of visual art ... If you want answers to a many-dimensioned tale of the corrosions of love and lovelessness, you must bring your own life and thoughts. No one will fail to find, in this strange, disturbing jewel, some reflecting facet of himself or herself.

12/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

While the subject matter is about as raw as it gets, McQueen and Morgan do leaven it with some lighter moments ... But it’s McQueen’s astonishing knack for layering thought itself into his images that really stuns, and Shame is packed with scenes which are both immaculately composed and seething with meaning.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


Screen

Mark Adams

Perhaps the title refers to an unexplained moment in Brandon and Sissy’s past, or perhaps McQueen is hinting that Brandon finally feels a shame in his behaviour and seeks to change. In truth it doesn’t really matter – the real strength of the film is its stark, brutally honest and challenging detailing of one man’s obsession with sex.

04/09/2011

Read Full Review


Time Out

Dave Calhoun

Shame is interested in the stark immediacy of one man’s world and drawing us into that world without easy explanations. It’s a work that feels, both for our times and of them.

09/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Times

Kate Muir

McQueen’s movie has a style all of its own, a subtle sheen, and the sex scenes are more coolly observational than erotic, with a classical soundtrack that somehow sanitises the sleaze. The images are hard to shake off, months afterwards.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


Total Film

Rosie Fletcher

A carnal drama that spares no blushes and pulls no punches. Likely to be one of 2012’s bravest and best.

03/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Never settling into the rhythms of a conventional film, it shuffles some scenes into disorientating montages, and lets others run on for several minutes without a single cut. Not a moment goes by without McQueen reaching for something eerier and more stylish than you're expecting.

15/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Observer

Philip French

As intense, expressive and physically controlled as a clenched fist.

15/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

With tremendous performances from Fassbender and Mulligan, and such superb technique from McQueen, this is a horrible inferno.

12/01/2012

Read Full Review


Empire Magazine

Damon Wise

The film lurches fatally into melodrama in its closing minutes, but although it adds a grim, moralistic aftertaste, it isn’t enough to derail an unflinching, moving study of 21st-century loneliness. Brave, beautifully acted and emotionally revealing.

09/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

A psychologically claustrophobic film that strips its characters bare literally and figuratively, leaving them, and us, nowhere to hide.

02/12/2011

Read Full Review


Uncut Magazine

Michael Bonner

Strangely, for a film filled with memorable and often shocking images, this is one that lingers: Brandon, alone, running through a noctural neon landscape.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


The New Yorker

Anthony Lane

McQueen could hardly be hipper, yet he remains, to an extent, an old-fashioned aesthete, drawn to extreme behavior in his characters not because of any trials of spirit that they undergo but because he is challenging himself to unleash the wildest material that he, wielding his camera, can then possess and tame. The result is pure and pitiless, and, in the case of “Shame,” oddly disapproving.

05/01/2012

Read Full Review


The New York Times

A. O. Scott

The movie, for all its displays of honesty (which is to say nudity), is also curiously coy. It presents Brandon for our titillation, our disapproval and perhaps our envy, but denies him access to our sympathy. I know, that’s the point, that Mr. McQueen wants to show how the intensity of Brandon’s need shuts him off from real intimacy, but this seems to be a foregone conclusion, the result of an elegant experiment that was rigged from the start.

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

David Sexton

A highly organised and polished piece of work but it is not only not erotic, it is oddly uninvolving altogether.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The cold calculation of McQueen's style is repellent but not uninteresting. The hard, glinting surfaces of New York are balanced against the endless close-ups of faces to convey a sense of loneliness and desperation – though not, as far as one can tell, of shame.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

McQueen’s film has hit some zeitgeistian nerve that has to do with a widespread anxiety about our consumer-driven, sex-saturated culture. It’s the first film to deal with a distinct social type of our time: the sex addict.

15/01/2012

Read Full Review


Time Magazine

Richard Corliss

Shame is not pornographic, but this vividly clinical depiction of satyriasis is explicit enough to land the film an NC-17 rating, the American equivalent of the old, tawdry X. That makes Fassbender the ultimate X-Man.

01/12/2011

Read Full Review


The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

Steve McQueen has again cast Fassbender as a single-minded, emotionally barricaded loner with the initials B S. There is, of course, another kind of B S, and while I would be loath to use that expression to describe Shame, I think McQueen and his co-writer, Abi Morgan, could have dropped the "e" from their movie's title.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Scotsman

Alistair Harkness

Beautifully filmed, meticulously composed and intensely acted, it demands to be taken seriously as a work of cinematic art, yet doing anything more than blithely accepting the film on this level makes it impossible to ignore how conventional, derivative and simplistic it is.

12/01/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

I’ve seen this film described as ‘important’, but there’s nothing original about exposing the emptiness of promiscuity. While Shame has style to spare, it isn’t as well-written, entertaining or socially aware as it pretends to be. Which is, indeed, a shame.

13/01/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore