Mozart's Sister

Mozart's Sister

The speculative account of Maria Anna "Nannerl" Mozart, five years older than Wolfgang and a musical prodigy in her own right. 2.5 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Mozart's Sister

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Drama
Director René Feret
Cast Marc Barbé, Delphine Chuillot, Marie Féret
Studio
Release Date April 2012
Running Time 120 mins
 

The speculative account of Maria Anna "Nannerl" Mozart, five years older than Wolfgang and a musical prodigy in her own right.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

A superior speculation on the Mozart family that eschews feminist cant to present a melancholic treatise on transient celebrity and wasted talent.

10/04/2012

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The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard

The Versailles setting is as awe-inspiring as the thought that, had she not been a woman, Nanneri might well have been as famous as her brother.

13/04/2012

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The Financial Times

Antonia Quirke

A varnished, interesting production that takes us even to Versailles, but is at its best when the Mozart family quip

12/04/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Writer-director René Féret imagines the young Miss Mozart's friendship with the teenage son and daughter of Louis XV – also trammelled by the social order of the day – and presents a touching and telling portrait of the times.

13/04/2012

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Time Out

Trevor Johnston

True, this slightly ploddy and overlong offering gets the key point across early on and coasts from there, but Marie-Jeanne Séréro’s lovely speculative score makes Nannerl’s embattled creativity sing out after all these years.

11/04/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

it's a well-designed, tasteful affair. But as none of Nannerl's music exists, judgments on her talent, as opposed to the cruel way contemporary mores insisted on her being treated, remain moot.

15/04/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

There’s enough here to suggest that Féret could have made a rewarding film by staying close to the facts throughout. What he invents instead, a tall tale about Nannerl falling for the French dauphin, is neither dramatic nor thought-provoking.

15/04/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It has a seriousness that commands attention, and a very believable sense of the hardship and bitterness Mozart Sr put his family through. It is a good subject. If only this film weren't so turgid, and didn't have that strained quality in the sound recording that picks up every extraneous costume-rustle and makes the background silence in every scene seem like a continuous hiss.

12/04/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

It's plodding stuff, made worse by the stilted performances of the two female leads, both of whom happen to be the director's daughters.

15/04/2012

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It is hard to imagine two young women who look more profoundly uncomfortable on screen than the director René Féret’s two daughters. Unfortunately one of them is cast in the central role of Nannerl, the eponymous sister of Wolfgang.

13/04/2012

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