Goodbye First Love

Goodbye First Love

Paris, winter 1999. Camille is 15, Sullivan is 19. Although they love each other passionately, Sullivan wants to go travel in South America for a year - a plan that fills Camille with despair ... 2003. Camille is fully devoted to her architectural studies. She meets a well-known architect, Lorenz, who makes her once again feel confident in herself. She falls in love with him.2007. Camille and Lorenz form a solid couple. Camille is his assistant, but she feels that she will soon be ready to start her own agency. It is then that Sullivan once more crosses her path. 3.5 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Goodbye First Love

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Drama
Director Mia Hansen-Løve
Cast Sebastian Urzendowsky, Magne-Håvard Brekke, Valérie Bonneton, Serge Renko Lola Créton
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date May 2012
Running Time 110 mins
 

Paris, winter 1999. Camille is 15, Sullivan is 19. Although they love each other passionately, Sullivan wants to go travel in South America for a year - a plan that fills Camille with despair ... 2003. Camille is fully devoted to her architectural studies. She meets a well-known architect, Lorenz, who makes her once again feel confident in herself. She falls in love with him.2007. Camille and Lorenz form a solid couple. Camille is his assistant, but she feels that she will soon be ready to start her own agency. It is then that Sullivan once more crosses her path.

Reviews

The Observer

Philip French

a splendid, understated film, unsentimental and wholly without that kind of cynicism that passes for worldly wisdom. It's as precise and ultimately as undefined as life itself.

06/05/2012

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

Some will find Camille too self-absorbed, yet writer/director Mia Hansen-Løve conjures poignancy, grace and a feel for symbolic seasonal change that’s positively Renoir-esque.

30/04/2012

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Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

This is the kind of sentimental education for which French cinema was invented.

01/05/2012

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The Financial Times

Leo Robson

High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/35dc3f22-9505-11e1-ad72-00144feab49a.html#ixzz1tu3rsCAX Lola Créton, who appeared in Catherine Breillat’s Bluebeard in 2009, but is called upon here to evoke that sense of churning uncertainty, and that response of determined striving, more typically associated with Eric Rohmer. Créton has the doe-like Rohmer face, and Hansen-Løve has the cool Rohmer touch – the one that lends grandeur to tales of middle-class Parisian heartache.

03/05/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

What is refreshing about Hansen-Løve's movie is that it doesn't fob its characters or its audiences off with the usual gentle hindsight-condescension about young love or first love. It is a commonplace to think that, oh, if only we could climb into a time machine and travel back to visit our teenage lovelorn selves, sobbing our hearts out in our bedrooms. If only we could hug our former selves and tell them it's all right, and it doesn't matter. Hansen-Løve is telling us something quite different: of course it matters. Heartbroken young love is the most intense kind, perhaps the only authentic kind. And you will never forget it and never entirely get over it.

03/05/2012

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

As her latest work, the beautifully honest and psychologically astute"Goodbye First Love"demonstrates, Hansen-Løve has a natural sensitivity to her characters in general and to the women who are often her focus in particular. Nothing is rushed, everything is given its appropriate time and place. When we watch Hansen-Løve's films, we're not only experiencing a life unfolding before us, we're also realizing what a great privilege it is to be able to do that.

20/04/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

The young stars may irritate as many viewers as they delight, but their rather stroppy chemistry is convincing and memorable.

03/05/2012

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

We see the months and years pass in sly shots of calendars and diaries, although if that makes ‘Goodbye First Love’ sound like a French version of ‘One Day’, it should be said that Hansen-Løve’s style is strictly unmelodramatic and she’s wary of allowing the big events in her characters’ lives to get in the way of a more sideways, fluid study of behaviour and emotion. You imagine that the spirit of Eric Rohmer hangs heavily over her approach to filmmaking.

02/05/2012

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Hansen-Love seems to catch life as it happens, sometimes in a rush and sometimes with delicious leisureliness (most notably during a brief vacation Sullivan and Camille spend alone at her parents’ country house in the Ardèche region of France). There is nothing ostentatious in this movie, and also, remarkably, nothing false, except perhaps some of the hopes of the earnest young couple at its heart.

19/04/2012

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The Times

Kate Muir

The director is a rising star, Mia Hansen-Løve, and her aversion to the obvious is pleasing.

04/05/2012

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Hansen-Love tells what is hardly an original story in an entirely original way, leaving gaps for us to mull over and refusing obvious romantic cliché. This is serious stuff about the perils of young love, without the usual tumbling sex scenes and Hollywood over-dramatisation.

04/05/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

There are keen insights into her psyche — namely, keen observation from the outside. The director takes an interest in the way small events can, with no rhyme or reason, subtly change the atmosphere between two lovers, and in how a series of such events can lead to the sudden disappearance of feelings that had seemed permanent. It makes for a fluid naturalistic drama

06/05/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Hansen-Love directs in a placid, matter-of-fact way that's not very sexy nor particularly revealing; it's also a pity that the sidelong wit of her previous film has been mislaid.

04/05/2012

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Scotland on Sunday

Siobhan Synnot

Authentically annoying.

29/04/2012

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