In Your Hands

In Your Hands

Told predominantly through a flashback, In Your Hands explores the relationship between the cold, lonely surgeon Anna Cooper and her kidnapper, Yann Ochberg who blames her for the loss of his wife, who died during an operation she performed. However, Yann is not capable of murder or premeditated violence, and as time passes the pair form a connection based on their shared loneliness. 2.6 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
In Your Hands

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Drama
Director Lola Doillon
Cast Kristen Scott Thomas
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date July 2012
Running Time 81 mins
 

Told predominantly through a flashback, In Your Hands explores the relationship between the cold, lonely surgeon Anna Cooper and her kidnapper, Yann Ochberg who blames her for the loss of his wife, who died during an operation she performed. However, Yann is not capable of murder or premeditated violence, and as time passes the pair form a connection based on their shared loneliness.

Reviews

Empire Magazine

David Hughes

Both of the two central performances and Doillon’s sure handling of difficult material are equally impressive in this brief but astute examination of the complexities of human affairs.

16/07/2012

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Kristin Scott Thomas plays another of her fine-boned, high-strung madames in this odd two-hander.

20/07/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

As sure as Wimbledon, caped crusaders, and the utter lack of acceptable weather, July brings counter-programming to the art-houses, in the shape of Kristin Scott Thomas doing intense things in French ... a rigorously switched-on central performance is pretty much a given. She has her rivals: Juliette Binoche crumples more profoundly; Tilda Swinton aches more exquisitely; Isabelle Huppert goes more nuts. Still, Scott Thomas rules the roost if we’re looking at inner burn, at the fury that always seems to be snacking on her marrow. If emotional masochism ever became a four-a-side team sport, this quartet would never lose.

19/07/2012

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

At a taut 81 mins, this crisply shot two-hander is further proof of how modern French cinema consistently allows Scott Thomas opportunities to excel in psychologically challenging roles.

19/07/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

In this first part there's an emotional ebb and flow, the threat of violence and some physical conflict, as the two discuss the case and its emotional ramifications. In the second part, a delayed instance of the Stockholm syndrome, some mixture of guilt and sympathy seems to draw Anna to seek out Yann. A passionate affair ensues that is in its way as dangerous as the period of incarceration, possibly more so.

22/07/2012

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

Early scenes between Anna and Yann – convinced he’s the victim of her professional misconduct – are thrilling. She’s in every way his superior, batting him away like a schoolboy and icily dismissing his grievances. The weak link is the script, which implausibly turns on Anna developing Stockholm Syndrome.

18/07/2012

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Scott Thomas tries hard to persuade you that this is a worthwhile study of a conflicted woman, but the plot of Lola Doillon’s film is so banal, it might as well be Hollywood nonsense.

22/07/2012

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The Times

Wendy Ide

Clever Kristin Scott Thomas. Fed up with being cast as brittle toffs in British costume dramas, she has forged a parallel career in quality French art-house cinema, working with directors who don’t automatically see her as an uptight posho. Still, even the French don’t always get it right.

20/07/2012

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

The film begins intriguingly and promises much, with an interesting flashback structure which initially conceals as much as it reveals. But in its third act, the movie runs out of ideas and has no more to tell us.

19/07/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

It's really just a bare-bones fringe play without enough dialogue to explain the bewildering choices its characters make.

22/07/2012

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