Beverly Hills Chihuahua

Beverly Hills Chihuahua

Chloe (voice of DREW BARRYMORE) a diamond-clad, bootie wearing Beverly Hills Chihuahua enjoys her luxurious life so much, she hardly notices Papi (voice of GEORGE LOPEZ), a tough looking Chihuahua who happens to be head-over-paws for the pampered pooch. But when Chloe gets lost in the rough streets of Mexico with only a street-wise German Shepherd (voice of ANDY GARCIA) to help her find her way home, Papi heads south of the border -- joining forces with a motley crew: two humans (PIPER PERABO, MANOLO CARDONA), a sly rat (voice of CHEECH MARIN) and a nervous iguana (voice of PAUL RODRIGUEZ) - to rescue his true love. --©Walt Disney Pictures 2.1 out of 5 based on 16 reviews
Beverly Hills Chihuahua

Omniscore:

Certificate U
Genre Family / Children
Director Raja Gosnell
Cast Andy Garcia, Jamie Lee Curtis, Plácido Domingo Drew Barrymore
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
Release Date January 2009
Running Time 91 minutes
 

Chloe (voice of DREW BARRYMORE) a diamond-clad, bootie wearing Beverly Hills Chihuahua enjoys her luxurious life so much, she hardly notices Papi (voice of GEORGE LOPEZ), a tough looking Chihuahua who happens to be head-over-paws for the pampered pooch. But when Chloe gets lost in the rough streets of Mexico with only a street-wise German Shepherd (voice of ANDY GARCIA) to help her find her way home, Papi heads south of the border -- joining forces with a motley crew: two humans (PIPER PERABO, MANOLO CARDONA), a sly rat (voice of CHEECH MARIN) and a nervous iguana (voice of PAUL RODRIGUEZ) - to rescue his true love. --©Walt Disney Pictures

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Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

A pampered lap dog, voiced by Drew Barrymore, gets lost in Mexico. Not as bad as you might assume, 'Beverly Hills Chihuahua' is a live-action Disney film that has more of the classic Disney spirit than any of the cartoons they've made over the past decade.

18/01/2009

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Total Film

Ken McIntyre

A state-of-the-art kid-pleaser for sure, but recession-weary parents will probably find it a mite obnoxious.

12/01/2009

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Channel 4 Film

Neil Smith

For the most part, however, Scooby-Doo director Raja Gosnell plays things with a pretty straight bat, acknowledging the essential ludicrousness of its talking-mutt scenario while still delivering the kind of family-friendly frivolity we've come to expect from Disney's mainstream commercial product... Younger audiences will adore this canine caper, though grown-ups might feel its one joke is stretched too far.

23/04/2009

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The Mirror

Mark Adams

But in truth, this good-natured Disney comedy is an engaging romp, as a snobby chihuahua named Chloe (nicely voiced by Drew Barrymore) gets lost when her similarly spoiled Beverly Hills minder (Piper Parebo) heads off on holiday to Baja, Mexico.

11/01/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

The film combines Lassie Come Home and Trading Places (the casting of Jamie Lee Curtis as Chloe's rich owner underlines this aspect) and the talking dogs speak more eloquently than the dumb humans and have all the jokes.

18/01/2009

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Scotland on Sunday

Siobhan Synnot

A talking iguana, a talking rat and even opera star Placido Domingo are tossed into the mix, but the plot is dry dog food and the jokes suggest few real wags were employed behind the scenes. Yappy and annoying even at 86 minutes, cat lovers and anyone older than 12 might prefer to imagine an alternative feature: Beverly Hills Cujo.

11/01/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

It shops, it trots, it talks like Drew Barrymore. "Now I've seen it all," says a heroic German Shepherd, discovering a secret chihuahua community in the Andes. He's not wrong.

15/01/2009

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Empire Magazine

Anna Smith

It’s hugely silly, but peppy enough to be tolerable. What grates most are the patronising racial stereotypes: the dirty Mexican dogs are just waiting to be rescued by LA ladies and given a good bath.

23/04/2009

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

One of the themes is the fact that canines deserve more than perpetual fussing over by rich, middle-class Beverly Hills types and ought to be treated as animals rather than toys. This is what makes it bearable. That and the way the talking dogs are trained up for the occasion. You want to cringe as the picture begins, but you end up quite enjoying it.

15/01/2009

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The Daily Express

Allan Hunter

This lightweight comedy adventure is cute for kids but pretty tiresome for the rest of us.

16/01/2009

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

This piece of egregious silliness from Disney - featuring live-action canines with CGI moving mouths - isn't quite as awful as it sounds.

16/01/2009

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The Times

Trevor Johnston

A live-action variant on The Lady and the Tramp, it strings together slapstick, adventure and romance as a pampered LA pooch finds herself stranded south of the Mexican border with a streetwise Alsatian. While the digitally enhanced canines (voiced by Drew Barrymore and Andy Garcia) are cute rather than creepy, the humour is strictly kiddie flick

17/01/2009

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The Sunday Times

Wendy Ide

In a triumph of animal wrangling and CGI tinkering, the canine cast turn in better performances than some of the humans, but actors of all species are not served well by dull-witted dialogue that substitutes crudely modified West Coast vernacular clichés (“Talk to the paw!”) for actual wit. Still, children will love this high- maintenance hound.

15/01/2009

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Time Out

Anna Smith

So: lazy script, annoying heroines, cultural stereotypes… this should be a one-star family comedy. But there’s absurd appeal in a big musical number: a choreographed Chihuahua dance in Mayan ruins. When it acknowledges its naffness, this has the potential to be an ironic cult hit. But the sappy half of this mixed-up movie is strictly for kids.

15/01/2009

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The Los Angeles Times

Mark Olsen

Once upon a time, children’s films were gentle, freewheeling tales in which animals and people could interact and minor life lessons could be imparted to the youth. Now, in films like “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” they are crass, reductionist affairs, indoctrinating kids to consumer culture. Seen with the wrong pair of eyes, it is nothing short of majorly depressing.

03/10/2008

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Variety

Peter Debruge

A filthy-rich fantasy for these cash-strapped times, "Beverly Hills Chihuahua" features the voices of Drew Barrymore and much of the industry’s top Latino talent in a live-action talking-dog lark that should please young pups. At the same time, it peddles tacky stereotypes in thick Hispanic accents, effectively ceding whatever dignity the breed regained since the "Yo quiero Taco Bell" campaign went off the air.

29/09/2008

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