Where The Wild Things Are

Where The Wild Things Are

Innovative director Spike Jonze collaborates with celebrated author Maurice Sendak to bring one of the most beloved books of all time to the big screen in “Where the Wild Things Are,” a classic story about childhood and the places we go to figure out the world we live in. The film tells the story of Max, a rambunctious and sensitive boy who feels misunderstood at home and escapes to where the Wild Things are. Max lands on an island where he meets mysterious and strange creatures whose emotions are as wild and unpredictable as their actions. The Wild Things desperately long for a leader to guide them, just as Max longs for a kingdom to rule. When Max is crowned king, he promises to create a place where everyone will be happy. Max soon finds, though, that ruling his kingdom is not so easy and his relationships there prove to be more complicated than he originally thought...--©Official Site 2.9 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Where The Wild Things Are

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Family / Children
Director Spike Jonze
Cast Catherine Keener, Paul Dano, James Gandolfini, Catherine O'Hara Forest Whitaker
Studio Warner Bros UK
Release Date December 2009
Running Time 101 mins
 

Innovative director Spike Jonze collaborates with celebrated author Maurice Sendak to bring one of the most beloved books of all time to the big screen in “Where the Wild Things Are,” a classic story about childhood and the places we go to figure out the world we live in. The film tells the story of Max, a rambunctious and sensitive boy who feels misunderstood at home and escapes to where the Wild Things are. Max lands on an island where he meets mysterious and strange creatures whose emotions are as wild and unpredictable as their actions. The Wild Things desperately long for a leader to guide them, just as Max longs for a kingdom to rule. When Max is crowned king, he promises to create a place where everyone will be happy. Max soon finds, though, that ruling his kingdom is not so easy and his relationships there prove to be more complicated than he originally thought...--©Official Site

Visit official website

Watch the trailer

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Dan Jolin

Because it’s not an actioner. Nor, in the conventional sense, an adventure picture. In fact, it’s not really even a children’s film. And, while there’s astounding VFX in most scenes, you won’t even notice they’re there. The film’s entirely lacking in chase scenes, winky pop-culture references or, most thankfully, any physical manifestation of external jeopardy (baddie monsters, a watered-down Dr. Moreau figure, greedy humans drilling for oil on Wild Thing Island...). This may put some off, but Where The Wild Things Are is, instead, a plotless, bittersweet mood-piece that laments the inevitable passing of childhood.

16/02/2010

Read Full Review


The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

On occasion, Mr. Jonze lingers too long on his lovely pictures, particularly on the island, where the film’s energy starts to wane, despite the glorious whoops in Carter Burwell and Karen O’s score. Mr. Jonze loves Max’s wild things, but you don’t need to hang around long to adore them as well. Yet these are minor complaints about a film that often dazzles during its quietest moments, as when Max sets sail, and you intuit his pluck and will from the close-ups of him staring into the unknown.

16/10/2009

Read Full Review


Time Out

Ben Walters

It’s hard to guess whether many children will enjoy the movie. Ponderous at times, it could probably be 15 minutes shorter and lacks a real sense of mortal danger... But ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ stands out for its unusually potent evocation of the timbre of childhood imagining, with its combination of the outré and the banal, grand schemes jumbled up with delicate feelings and the urge to smash things up.

10/12/2009

Read Full Review


Variety

Todd McCarthy

Fleet of foot, emotionally attuned to its subject and instinctively faithful to its celebrated source, "Where the Wild Things Are" earns a lot of points for its hand-crafted look and unhomogenized, dare-one-say organic rendering of unrestrained youthful imagination. But director Spike Jonze's sharp instincts and vibrant visual style can't quite compensate for the lack of narrative eventfulness that increasingly bogs down this bright-minded picture.

11/10/2009

Read Full Review


The Times

Wendy Ide

It’s all very charming and quirky. The hipster flavour that Jonze adds to the film, together with the soundtrack from the downtown NY goddess Karen O, certainly makes this tonally unique among children’s films. But it’s also, ultimately, a little flimsy and unlikely to achieve anything like the iconic status of its source material.

11/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

Jonze has said he didn’t want to make a children’s film, but rather a film about children — and that sums up what’s wrong with his version of Where the Wild Things Are. He’s showing adults what it’s like to be a child, full of anger, loneliness and frustration, but children don’t want a film about being a child. They want action, adventure, fantasy, a chance to escape from the confines of their junior world.

13/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Sukhdev Sandhu

Where The Wild Things Are - its listlessness and torpor, its swathes of noodling dialogue about the solar system dying — is a betrayal of its source material’s affirmatory spirit. Sendak has expressed his approval, but really!

10/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Times

Kevin Maher

But the tone here is everything. And Jonze’s depiction of the waning days of childhood is so strong, and his recreation through the Wild Things of the loneliness and confusion therein so affecting, that the movie’s emotive power seems to overcome its many shortcomings.

12/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

Where the Wild Things Are is unashamedly an art movie in a poetic-realism vein, and by far the weirdest film supposedly made for children since Robert Altman tried his hand at Popeye. Younger children, I suspect, will be terrified, and I doubt that older ones will care for it much. Child psychologists, on the other hand, will be fascinated.

13/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

In two of his previous films, "Being John Malkovich" and "Adaptation," Jonze brought an appealingly offbeat sensibility to a pair of strong Charlie Kaufman scripts. When faced as a director with the rudderless screenplay he co-wrote with Eggers, he's been powerless to energize it in any involving way. Sometimes you are better off with 10 sentences than tens of millions of dollars, and this is one of those times.

16/10/2009

Read Full Review


The New Yorker

David Denby

After a strong beginning, Spike Jonze’s live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak’s children’s classic runs into the sands.

26/10/2009

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Jonze's design extrapolates the book very cleverly, but I have a feeling that loyal fans and family audiences looking for fun may be disconcerted. It certainly doesn't offer much Christmas jollity. Jonze's fans, on the other hand, will find that this director's talents remain untamed.

10/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Observer

Philip French

It's all terribly spelt out and stretched out, and halfway through, my inner child asked me why I'd brought him to this rather than to Toy Story 3D.

13/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Independent

Anthony Quinn

I have no idea what Jonze and Eggers are trying to say here, either to children or to adults, but it's difficult to imagine how they could have made a more tedious and exasperating attempt at it.

11/12/2009

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

The Jonze/Eggers message must be that Max’s fantasyland duplicates his home life and that maybe mimicry and reflection will exorcise reality. But shouldn’t therapy, at least in art for or about childhood, be fun? The book was entrancing. The book deserved better.

11/12/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore