Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

From Walt Disney Pictures and visionary director Tim Burton comes an epic 3D fantasy adventure "Alice in Wonderland," a magical and imaginative twist on some of the most beloved stories of all time. Nineteen-year-old Alice returns to the whimsical world she first encountered as a young girl, reuniting with her childhood friends: the White Rabbit, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Dormouse, the Caterpillar, the Cheshire Cat, and of course, the Mad Hatter. Alice embarks on a fantastical journey to find her true destiny and end the Red Queen's reign of terror. 2.6 out of 5 based on 16 reviews
Alice in Wonderland

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Family / Children
Director Tim Burton
Cast Anne Hathaway, Barbara Windsor, Christopher Lee, Crispin Glover, Helena Bonham Carter, Johnny Depp, Matt Lucas, Mia Wasikowska, Michael Sheen, Stephen Fry, Timothy Spall Alan Rickman
Studio Walt Disney UK
Release Date March 2010
Running Time 1-2 mins
 

From Walt Disney Pictures and visionary director Tim Burton comes an epic 3D fantasy adventure "Alice in Wonderland," a magical and imaginative twist on some of the most beloved stories of all time. Nineteen-year-old Alice returns to the whimsical world she first encountered as a young girl, reuniting with her childhood friends: the White Rabbit, Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Dormouse, the Caterpillar, the Cheshire Cat, and of course, the Mad Hatter. Alice embarks on a fantastical journey to find her true destiny and end the Red Queen's reign of terror.

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Reviews

The Times

Kate Muir

Never have toves been so slithy or a film so brillig. Tim Burton’s spectacular re-imagining of Alice in Wonderland incorporates Lewis Carroll’s famous Jabberwocky poem into a 3-D epic. Traditionalists may bemoan Burton’s Gothic riff, but the hallucinogenic humour is true to the original. The cast is stellar.

06/03/2010

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Time Out

Dave Calhoun

Yet much of Carroll’s magical nonsense remains, even if Burton’s film wobbles at the gates of anarchy and ends up being a more average affair than many might expect. It’s also one in which the inventive costumes and individual flights of animated fancy end up being more memorable than the thin characters and half-hearted  3D rendering. As it’s Burton at the helm, you could call it gothic. The less generous might just call it gloomy.

04/03/2010

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

Yet for all its visual splendours, there’s something missing. Burton’s film should be as mad as a hatter — a work of exuberant and bold barminess, with the strangeness of a dream, the fever of delirium and the grand hallucinatory quality of a LSD trip — but it isn’t. In the second half, it slumps into the formulaic and the familiar.

07/03/2010

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Total Film

Kevin Harley

As lopped heads bob in the Red Queen’s (Helena Bonham Carter, shouty) moat and the White Queen (Anne Hathaway, wispy) mixes potions from old fingers, the theoretically perfect fit of Tim Burton to Lewis Carroll’s skewed surrealism seems perfect in practice, too. As Burton “re-imaginings” go, it’s no stinking Apes. It’s closer to Charlie And The Chocolate Factory, touting sweet scoff for the eyes but struggling to provide a story with the intended emotional weight.

05/03/2010

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Variety

Todd McCarthy

"You've lost your muchness," Johnny Depp's Mad Hatter remarks to his newly shrunken teenage friend, and much the same could be said of Tim Burton in the wake of his encounter with a Victorian-era heroine of imaginative powers even wilder than his own. Quite like what one would expect from such a match of filmmaker and material and also something less, this "Alice in Wonderland" has its moments of delight, humor and bedazzlement. But it also becomes more ordinary as it goes along

25/03/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

David Gritten

Alice repeats that this is her dream and she can do what she likes: her sense of self-determination makes Carroll’s Alice seem insipid. Given how enjoyably Burton’s film proceeds, this matters little. Mia Wasikowska, so striking in the HBO series In Treatment, confirms herself as a hugely impressive actress... Yet after an hour the story stops dead and anticipates Alice’s climactic battle with the Jabberwock. Sadly, it’s derivative, straight from Lord of the Rings, as armour-clad Alice brandishes a sword beneath lowering clouds and craggy cliffs. All the preceding playful inventiveness is jettisoned for a routine hero-myth climax. What a letdown.

04/03/2010

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Empire Magazine

Angie Errigio

Sadly Lewis lite and not without flaws but this is as Burtonesque as one could wish for, a real treat for fans of his twisted imagination and great British character actors.

25/05/2010

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Is Alice In Wonderland worth seeing? Yes, because it's a feast for the eyes. But the story needed to be more imaginative and involving for this to become a massive hit, and it's far from obvious whether it's aimed at children or adults.

05/03/2010

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

This air of resignation lies heavy on the film. Part of the problem is that a director as textured and tactile as Burton once was can only be neutralised by the digital revolution. In his early films, Pee-Wee's Big Adventure and Beetlejuice, the monsters were sculpted from gaily coloured clay, and rendered in twitchy stop-motion. I'm not being a Luddite when I say that the sleek Photoshop gloss of the effects in Alice in Wonderland represents a backward leap, just as the synthetic blue-screen sets create an airlessness more readily associated with George Lucas.

04/03/2010

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The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

Mr. Burton’s heroine is a wan figure to hang an entire world on, and Ms. Wasikowska, who’s a livelier, truer presence in the forthcoming “The Kids Are All Right,” barely registers among Mr. Burton’s clanging and the computer-generated galumphing. This isn’t an impossible story to translate to the screen, as the Czech filmmaker Jan Svankmajer showed with “Alice” (1988), where the divide between reality and fantasy blurs as it does in dreams. It’s just hard to know why Mr. Burton, who doesn’t seem much interested in Alice, bothered.

05/03/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

There are some funny exchanges, particularly between the Red Queen and the Mad Hatter, but for me the weightless, frictionless, whimsical world of fantasy is often, frankly, dull. Burton's visual design is of course highly distinctive, though even here I have to raise a complaint against the subliminal corporate-branding which makes the White Queen's palace look like the Disney castle logo.

04/03/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The director keeps on threatening to break the shackles of his paymasters and deliver something wild, freewheeling, elusive – a film that grasps the topsy-turvy of Lewis Carroll's original story and graces it with his distinctive visual bravura. But the reality falls short: there just isn't enough wonder in this Alice.

05/03/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

Many false notes will grate equally with Carrollites and Burtonians: the introduction of cute character names (Iracebeth, Mallyumkin, McTwisp); the kitsch faery mansion of the White Queen (Anne Hathaway), an ethereal palace of pallor seemingly left over from the second Star Wars trilogy; a Jabberwock(y) who speaks with the voice of Christopher Lee; Avril Lavigne's screechy end-credits song; and the Hatter's concluding celebratory breakdance to funky organ backing (please, save that kind of thing for Shrek).

07/03/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

It has its successful moments but it's surprisingly inert overall, more like a Burton derivative than something he actually did himself.

04/03/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

This curiously flat film is never particularly funny and rarely demonstrates Burton's gifts as a spellbinding movie tale-teller. After a period of confusion it becomes clear that the book's episodic form has been replaced by an overarching quest story based on the Jabberwocky nonsense poem from Looking Glass.

07/03/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

You cannot believe the dreadfulness of Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland – gifted director takes on gaga script – until you see it. Enchantment has gone thataway.

03/03/2010

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