The Sorcerer's Apprentice

The Sorcerer's Apprentice

Balthazar Blake (NICOLAS CAGE) is a master sorcerer in modern-day Manhattan trying to defend the city from his arch-nemesis, Maxim Horvath (ALFRED MOLINA). Balthazar can't do it alone, so he recruits Dave Stutler (JAY BARUCHEL), a seemingly average guy who demonstrates hidden potential, as his reluctant protégé. The sorcerer gives his unwilling accomplice a crash course in the art and science of magic, and together, these unlikely partners work to stop the forces of darkness. It'll take all the courage Dave can muster to survive his training, save the city and get the girl as he becomes THE SORCERER'S APPRENTICE.--©Official Site 2.4 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
The Sorcerer's Apprentice

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Family / Children, Action / Adventure
Director Jon Turteltaub
Cast Jay Baruchel, Alfred Molina, Teresa Palmer, Toby Kebbel, Monica Bellucci Nicolas Cage
Studio Walt Disney UK
Release Date August 2010
Running Time 111 mins
 

Balthazar Blake (NICOLAS CAGE) is a master sorcerer in modern-day Manhattan trying to defend the city from his arch-nemesis, Maxim Horvath (ALFRED MOLINA). Balthazar can't do it alone, so he recruits Dave Stutler (JAY BARUCHEL), a seemingly average guy who demonstrates hidden potential, as his reluctant protégé. The sorcerer gives his unwilling accomplice a crash course in the art and science of magic, and together, these unlikely partners work to stop the forces of darkness. It'll take all the courage Dave can muster to survive his training, save the city and get the girl as he becomes THE SORCERER'S APPRENTICE.--©Official Site

Visit official website

Watch the trailer

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Ian Nathan

The big let-down is Cage. Of all the moments for the Bad Lieutenant to unleash the wobbly hands and swimming eyeballs, a thousand year-old sorcerer in a bad hat was screaming for it. This is a CG-vamped panto harkening after a franchise, so why the moody weirdo routine?

17/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It's an enjoyable action-fantasy adventure with a sparky script; there's even a playful pastiche of the broomsticks-coming-alive scene from the original legend, using the famous Paul Dukas music.

12/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Now that the Harry Potter franchise is getting so gloomy, it's a relief to see a film about a trainee wizard which is so much fun.

15/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

No one is likely to mistake it for art, but this is one of the better summer blockbusters, thanks to special effects, adequate acting and welcome flashes of wit. Words such as professional and capable spring to mind, rather than ingenious or imaginative.

12/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

No film with a line about being trapped in a “figurative urn of ridicule” is entirely lacking a sense of its own silliness, which helps.

12/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

It's not elegant, and isn't as entertaining as it might have been: two reliable showmen, Nicolas Cage as the sorcerer and Alfred Molina as his evil counterpart, are underused.

15/08/2010

Read Full Review


Total Film

Tony Horkins

Bruckheimer waves his wand at another would-be franchise, but the magic’s sporadic. Good-looking blockbusting-by-numbers.

02/08/2010

Read Full Review


Variety

Justin Chang

A noisy, f/x-spewing cauldron of a movie...

04/08/2010

Read Full Review


Time Out

Tom Huddleston

With Baruchel’s likeable lead turn hamstrung by a disastrous romantic subplot, some distinctly non-special effects and a script loaded with blunt expository dialogue, the film casts a superficial and short-lived spell.

12/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Times

Kevin Maher

In all this, Cage gives a classic pay-cheque performance, Molina makes a credible villain (as always), while Baruchel is solidly inoffensive. The actual Sorcerer’s Apprentice sequence, incidentally, where Dave’s mops go crazy, is the worst bit of the movie. And that’s saying something.

13/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Los Angeles Times

Michael Phillips

The many-hands script -- last one in was Matt Lopez of "Bedtime Stories" -- exists largely to show Cage and Baruchel and Molina shooting fire-jets and blue balls of compressed energy at each other's heads. The CGI is relentless and what you might call reverse-magical: The more we're hit with stuff, the less wondrous it becomes.

14/07/2010

Read Full Review


The Independent

Geoffrey MacNab

The film can't escape its own preposterousness. Turteltaub's direction veers between facetiousness and heavy-handed Gothic posturing. Magic this isn't.

13/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

Visual and special effects are by two Oscar winners in John Nelson and John Frazier and also the stunt co-ordinator who made Pirates of the Caribbean and the National Treasure films. They deserve mention because their work is really the be-all and end-all of a movie that seldom lets up, with car chases and duels to the death.

13/08/2010

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Bruckheimer produced The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, which is like National Treasure (another of his Disney franchises) crossed with a vaudeville version of Goethe’s Faust... fun for 20 minutes, remorseless thereafter.

11/08/2010

Read Full Review


The New York Times

A. O. Scott

It’s stupid. At several points Balthazar intones that the fate of mankind hangs in the balance. But it never feels as if more were at stake than the bottom line of Jerry Bruckheimer Films and the Walt Disney Company, who seem to have confected this lumbering amusement in the hopes of picking up a little Harry Potter cash in the interval between “The Half-Blood Prince” and “The Deathly Hallows.”

13/07/2010

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore