The Secret of Kells

The Secret of Kells

In a remote outpost of Ireland, young Brendan embarks on a new life of adventure when a celebrated master illuminator arrives from foreign lands carrying a book brimming with secret wisdom and powers. To help complete the magical book, Brendan has to overcome his deepest fears on a dangerous quest that takes him into the enchanted forest where mythical creatures lie.--©Official Site 4.0 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
The Secret of Kells

Omniscore:

Certificate PG
Genre Family / Children
Director Tomm Moore and Nora Twomey
Cast Mick Lally, Brendan Gleeson Evan McGuire
Studio Optimum Releasing
Release Date October 2010
Running Time 75 mins
 

In a remote outpost of Ireland, young Brendan embarks on a new life of adventure when a celebrated master illuminator arrives from foreign lands carrying a book brimming with secret wisdom and powers. To help complete the magical book, Brendan has to overcome his deepest fears on a dangerous quest that takes him into the enchanted forest where mythical creatures lie.--©Official Site

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Reviews

Empire Magazine

Helen O'Hara

Brendan’s quest mixes absurd humour and adventure, naïve art and intricate detail, in a way that could seem haphazard or chaotic but which is rigorously thought out – even in the traumatic detail of a climactic Viking attack. The result is a story that will enchant children but also offer something fresh and exciting for adults, the closest thing we’ve seen to a European Miyazaki movie.

03/10/2010

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The Los Angeles Times

Kenneth Turan

A ravishing, continually surprising example of largely hand-drawn animation in the heyday of computer-generated imagery, an inexpensive and sophisticated European production in an age of broad-stroke studio films, even a spirited defense of books and bookishness while Kindles walk the earth, "Kells" fights the tide every way it can.

02/04/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

Magical, funny, wholly lacking in po-faced piety, the movie incorporates elements of Irish mythology and is drawn in a flat, stylised fashion that derives from the art of the time.

03/10/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Marc Lee

Inspired by the pages of the Book itself (which is today on permanent display at Trinity College, Dublin), the look of the film is simply ravishing.

30/09/2010

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Time Out

Cath Clarke

The story is a bit tangled, and there is too much of it packed into nearly 80 minutes, but little kids won’t be bothered when the animation is so magical. Older ones may get restless.

30/09/2010

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The Times

Kate Muir

The Irish legend of the creation of the Book of Kells and the monks’ battle with marauding Vikings is compelling stuff for children, while the sheer artistry of the animation will please adults.

01/10/2010

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The New York Times

A. O. Scott

Brendan’s busy adventures load the film with a bit too much narrative for its brief running time, but the sometimes hectic plot ultimately serves as scaffolding for Mr. Moore’s extraordinary visual brio. Using the vivid colors and delicate lineations of the Book of Kells for inspiration, he establishes a surprising and completely persuasive link between the ancient art of manuscript illumination and the modern practice of animation.

05/03/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

The story wafts in too many different directions before dissipating altogether, but the film is still a treat, thanks to its stylised, kaleidoscopic artwork, which is like a cross between an Asterix book and a stained glass window.

03/10/2010

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Total Film

Ellen E Jones

Should Shrek loyalists find its delights too subtle, there’s plenty of slapstick and peril to compensate.

27/09/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

To my eye the visuals are likably reminiscent of Friz Freleng's Pink Panther, and of course a little more so of the Kells illustrations themselves. A low-key pleasure.

30/09/2010

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

This takes some getting used to, but it’s handsomely done and serves a decent story. Tomm Moore’s film deserves to find an audience.

03/10/2010

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