Involuntary

Involuntary

INVOLUNTARY is a series of stories exploring different perspectives on the power of a group over the individual. At once humorous and poignant, each situation raises questions about the value of the opinions of others: a man injured at his own party prefers to soldier on through the festivities rather than ruin the night for everyone else; a group of teenage girls pout, preen and flirt, pushing one another further in social and sexual games; a schoolteacher carries out a psychological experiment on her class to illustrate the power of peer pressure; and, at a drunken reunion a young man exploits his mates' willingness to go with the flow to take advantage of another friend.--©Official Site 3.3 out of 5 based on 12 reviews
Involuntary

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Foreign, Drama
Director Ruben Östlund
Cast Henrik Vikman, Leif Edlund, Olle Liljas, Vera Vitali, Villmar Björkman Maria Lundqvist
Studio Trinity Distribution
Release Date October 2010
Running Time 101 mins
 

INVOLUNTARY is a series of stories exploring different perspectives on the power of a group over the individual. At once humorous and poignant, each situation raises questions about the value of the opinions of others: a man injured at his own party prefers to soldier on through the festivities rather than ruin the night for everyone else; a group of teenage girls pout, preen and flirt, pushing one another further in social and sexual games; a schoolteacher carries out a psychological experiment on her class to illustrate the power of peer pressure; and, at a drunken reunion a young man exploits his mates' willingness to go with the flow to take advantage of another friend.--©Official Site

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Reviews

The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Östlund’s refusal to steer the film in a clear direction – a bit like the coach driver, in his case waiting (perhaps) for an audience admission of complicit human fallibility – makes it a brilliantly sustained tease.

27/10/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

You have to wait a while for the situations to unfold, but when they do they're worthy of Curb Your Enthusiasm.

31/10/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Admirers of Todd Solondz’s cinema of discomfort will find much to cringe at in this excellent dark comedy from Sweden.

28/10/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

What’s most distinctive about this mordant comedy of manners is the resolutely awkward cinematography. We’re more likely to get a shot of a character’s elbow than his or her face; conversations play out off-screen while the camera drinks in the reaction of a third party. It’s an effective technique — we feel like observers in a deliciously cruel social experiment.

28/10/2010

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Variety

Leslie Felperin

Offbeat lensing style and quirky humor...

20/05/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

It's a pawkily amusing attack on Swedish people's conformity and inclination towards reticence and respect for authority, at least when sober. But it's set in a homogeneous Nordic Sweden that appears to be unaffected demographically or behaviourally by the significant immigration of the past 40 years. Perhaps, however, this is part of the joke.

31/10/2010

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Time Out

Trevor Johnston

The staging and acting are utterly believable, encouraging the viewer to put themselves inside each dilemma, yet the characters’ heat-of-the-moment choices also outline the filmmaker’s view of Swedish society – viewed as a matrix of smug self-interest and unthinking consensus.

28/10/2010

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Empire Magazine

David Parkinson

Unsettlingly insistent, smartly played and bleakly hilarious.

01/11/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

The motif of the individual against the crowd recurs insistently, unsettlingly and sometimes hilariously, as characters agonise over the right thing to do. Ostlund may be Sweden's answer to Todd Solondz, though that is a mantle a young film-maker should be wary of trying on.

29/10/2010

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

No greater than the sum of its parts.

31/10/2010

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Total Film

Tom Dawson

The largely unknown cast convince, even if Östlund’s detached visual style – with its off-kilter character-framing – sometimes frustrates.

21/10/2010

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

A distinctively prickly, pessimistic, faintly unrewarding comedy of embarrassment.

28/10/2010

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