Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are)

Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are)

In the middle of Mexico City, a family are fighting to survive. After the death of their father, the children are faced with a dreadful problem. They are all cannibals and are addicted to human flesh: this is a family bound together by a terrible secret and a horrific appetite for destruction. 2.9 out of 5 based on 11 reviews
Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are)

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Foreign, Horror / Suspense
Director Jorge Michel Grau
Cast Miriam Balderas, Francisco Barreiro, Carmen Beato, Paulina Gaitan Adrián Aguirre
Studio Artificial Eye
Release Date November 2010
Running Time 90 mins
 

In the middle of Mexico City, a family are fighting to survive. After the death of their father, the children are faced with a dreadful problem. They are all cannibals and are addicted to human flesh: this is a family bound together by a terrible secret and a horrific appetite for destruction.

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Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It is horrible because it proposes, subtly and incrementally, a plausible psychological explanation for what is happening, which the audience must retrospectively insert into the narrative: cannibalism is a symptom of the horror, not the cause. And on a more basic, non-metaphorical level, it suggests that in Mexico City, rife with official incompetence, hypocrisy and corruption, the ultimate taboo is broken much more frequently than anyone in authority is prepared to admit.

11/11/2010

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

...neat, nasty, but entirely moral movie. Its writer-director, Jorge Michel Grau, presents cannibalism not as some unimaginable perversion, but as a social survival mechanism.

11/11/2010

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The Observer

Philip French

We Are What We Are is a film of considerable promise by a gifted movie-maker and, most interestingly, it goes against the current grain in its total lack of sentimentality and its refusal to romanticise its cannibals.

14/11/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Grau uses his rigorously grim scenario to mount a slightly studenty thesis about an underclass feeding on itself.

12/11/2010

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Time Out

Nigel Floyd

Yet for all its promise, it fails fully to flesh out its gruesome premise, its shaky mythological underpinnings and oblique social commentary, and ultimately fizzles out into cop-thriller clichés.

11/11/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It’s a neat set-up, but the entrée doesn’t live up to the promise of the appetiser. Inspiration and wit are low on the list on ingredients; the film prefers to focus on brooding longueurs punctuated by occasional bouts of extreme violence involving blunt instruments.

12/11/2010

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Total Film

Matt Glasby

A sullen effort, shot in muted ochre tones and only occasionally sparking to life through slashes of violence.

02/11/2010

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Empire Magazine

Adam Smith

Macabre, biting (apologies) and grimly funny, it's a bit like if Mike Leigh were to remake The Hills Have Eyes. From the cannibal’s point of view. In Mexican.

14/11/2010

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The Independent on Sunday

John Walsh

The trouble is that the basic premise is so risible, and the treatment so earnest, that nit-picking questions assail you. Must the family eat human flesh to avoid starvation – or could it settle for steak tartare?

14/11/2010

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Questions hang in the air – Why does the mother object to eating "whores"? What "rituals" govern their repulsive appetite? – which are gradually subsumed by more universal issues of family dysfunction, inchoate sexuality and grinding poverty. Not a date movie.

12/11/2010

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Unaccountably praised by some critics, the film is like a supermarket sandwich, flavourless as you consume it while leaving a slightly nasty taste in the mouth afterwards.

11/11/2010

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