Julia's Eyes

Julia's Eyes

Julia (Belen Rueda), a woman suffering from degenerative sight disease, finds her twin sister Sara, who has already gone blind as a result of the same disease, hanged in the basement of her house. In spite of the fact that everything points to suicide, Julia decides to investigate what she intuitively feels is a murder case, entering a dark world that seems to hide a mysterious presence. 3.4 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Julia's Eyes

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Horror / Suspense
Director Guillem Morales
Cast Lluis Homar, Pablo Derqui Belén Rueda
Studio Optimum Releasing
Release Date May 2011
Running Time 116 mins
 

Julia (Belen Rueda), a woman suffering from degenerative sight disease, finds her twin sister Sara, who has already gone blind as a result of the same disease, hanged in the basement of her house. In spite of the fact that everything points to suicide, Julia decides to investigate what she intuitively feels is a murder case, entering a dark world that seems to hide a mysterious presence.

Visit official website

Reviews

Empire Magazine

Anna Smith

Part psychological thriller, part slasher horror, part whodunnit, this is rich in atmosphere and suspense, with a commanding central performance from Rued

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Sunday Express

Henry Fitzherbert

Chillingly effective.

22/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Phelim O'Neill

While it's a little overlong and slightly flabby in places, it plays mostly fair so when a few of the more ludicrous twists arrive in the second half, there's enough goodwill generated by the thoughtful, creepy and effective setup to carry things through to the end.

19/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Independent on Sunday

Demetrios Matheou

Deliciously creepy.

22/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Observer

Philip French

Using blindness as a plot device, a metaphor for social awareness and as a numinous experience that romantically links minds, it's a fascinating, broken-backed picture full of riveting twists and dubious psychology.

22/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Times

Kevin Maher

At times breathlessly Hitchcockian, at others achingly arch and smarty-pants postmodern, this is a film for people who like their buttock-clenching tension mixed with sly ruminations on the nature of cinematic voyeurism.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

This elegant bit of storytelling is joined by equally good ideas in the story itself, but they are all used up before the finale.

22/05/2011

Read Full Review


Variety

Jonathan Holland

An eager-to-please, stylish chiller that leads the viewer up a satisfying number of blind alleys

12/09/2010

Read Full Review


Time Out

Nigel Floyd

The set-up is clear and convincing; the denouement leaves one squinting in disbelief.

18/05/2011

Read Full Review


Screen

Mike Goodridge

Morales barely gives the audience a moment’s respite as Julia lurches from one perilous situation to another.

12/09/2010

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

If only the writing of the second half measured up to the quality of Miss Rueda’s performance, this could have been a five-star masterpiece.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Writer-director Guillem Morales takes some standard tropes – dark corridors, power cuts, lurking silhouettes – and turns them to good advantage.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

Charlotte O'Sullivan

Rueda is a fantastic actress, tightly wound, but never brittle.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Marc Lee

The name of the great Guillermo del Toro is all over the publicity, but he’s only the producer and the results suggest he should have been a bit more hands-on. Director Guillem Morales overdoes the Grand Guignol until we’re numbed into submission.

19/05/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore