Push

Push

The Division, a shadowy government agency, is genetically transforming citizens into an army of psychic warriors—and brutally disposing of those unwilling to participate. Nick Gant (Chris Evans), a second-generation telekinetic or “mover,” has been in hiding since the Division murdered his father more than a decade earlier. He has found sanctuary in densely populated Hong Kong—the last safe place on earth for fugitive psychics like him—but only if he can keep his gift a secret. Nick is forced out of hiding when Cassie Holmes (Dakota Fanning), a 13-year-old clairvoyant or “watcher,” seeks his help in finding Kira, (Camilla Belle), an escaped “pusher” who may hold the key to ending the Division’s program. Pushers possess the most dangerous of all psychic powers: the ability to influence others’ actions by implanting thoughts in their minds. But Cassie’s presence soon attracts the attention of the Division’s human bloodhounds, forcing Nick and Cassie to flee for their lives.--© Summit 1.8 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Push

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Sci-Fi / Fantasy
Director Paul McGuigan
Cast Dakota Fanning, Camilla Belle, Djimon Hounsou Chris Evans
Studio Summit Entertainment
Release Date February 2009
Running Time 101 minutes
 

The Division, a shadowy government agency, is genetically transforming citizens into an army of psychic warriors—and brutally disposing of those unwilling to participate. Nick Gant (Chris Evans), a second-generation telekinetic or “mover,” has been in hiding since the Division murdered his father more than a decade earlier. He has found sanctuary in densely populated Hong Kong—the last safe place on earth for fugitive psychics like him—but only if he can keep his gift a secret. Nick is forced out of hiding when Cassie Holmes (Dakota Fanning), a 13-year-old clairvoyant or “watcher,” seeks his help in finding Kira, (Camilla Belle), an escaped “pusher” who may hold the key to ending the Division’s program. Pushers possess the most dangerous of all psychic powers: the ability to influence others’ actions by implanting thoughts in their minds. But Cassie’s presence soon attracts the attention of the Division’s human bloodhounds, forcing Nick and Cassie to flee for their lives.--© Summit

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Reviews

Channel 4 Film

Anton Bitel

McGuigan deserves credit for daring to be different, in taking such an unconventionally cerebral approach to this most dumb-assed of genres - and Dakota Fanning continues her reign as the finest child actress of her generation, even as she shows the first signs here of drifting into sassier, swearier teen years.

23/04/2009

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Empire Magazine

Helen O'Hara

Kinetic and convincing, this uses a limited budget to thrilling effect, giving us a sort of X-Men-meets-Trainspotting twist. We hope a sequel follows this early promise.

23/04/2009

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The Mirror

Mark Adams

Stylishly silly but oddly cool all the same.

15/01/2009

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The Scotsman

Damon Smith

The script, however, is riddled with unanswered questions and plot holes, such as Cassie's uncanny ability of drawing her dreams to show Nick the way, even when she is running for her life. Fanning is solid without ever being tested in an undem-anding lead role, gelling nicely with Evans' buff action hero who concocts the elaborate master plan to save the world without breaking sweat.

20/02/2009

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Total Film

Matt Glasby

Unconcerned with plot logic or character development, Push seems entranced with the endless possibilities of this universe. It’s an ambitious, original effort, but eventually McGuigan jettisons all sense in favour of sensation, and the film begins to feel like one of Cassie’s drawings: a vivid, if childish, flight of fancy that nearly, but not quite, comes good.

18/02/2009

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Directed with flair by Paul McGuigan amid snazzy Hong Kong backdrops, it’s still a dull trudge, the sort of popcorn movie that gets released in February rather than during the summer holidays.

22/02/2009

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The Los Angeles Times

Roger Moore

Anybody not familiar with the comics may be a little confused by all the differing flavors of telekinetic folk. The odd snappy line doesn't make up for a generally heartless script.

06/02/2009

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

There’s a fair amount to enjoy, notably Fanning’s performance and a manic sense of unpredictability. But silliness rules the day: plot holes abound and are plugged with techno-pounding action sequences and more nonsensical guff.

19/02/2009

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The Times

James Christopher

More worrying still is that Hudson’s 12-year-old daughter Cassie (Dakota Fanning) can read the future, and frankly it’s not looking good for any of the characters, particularly Nick (Chris Evans), a shiftless hero with telekinetic powers but precious little brain. “What if nothing we did made any sense. Would that throw them off the scent?” Nick asks. You bet.

19/02/2009

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Variety

Robert Koehler

"Push" has no pull. A confused jumble of parts in search of a whole, the film plays like a mix-tape sample of scenes from "Heroes," "Fringe," "Alias" and "The X-Files" as it follows good guys gifted with paranormal powers trying to stave off bad guys with the same powers to create a U.S. super army.

01/02/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

This is a movie daft and incompetent enough to make last year's supposedly "cool" teleportation thriller Jumper look like The Bourne Supremacy.

19/02/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

The violence is incessant, the portentousness constant, the opacity rarely penetrated. One of the team of young people confronting the Division comes up with a great scheme. "What if nothing we did made sense?" he suggests. Great idea!

22/02/2009

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The Daily Express

Allan Hunter

Director Paul McGuigan serves this up with a flashy swagger but there is no disguising the fact that it is an incomprehensible mess.

20/02/2009

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The Guardian

Xan Brooks

In the middle of Push, our hero hatches a fiendish plan that will come to govern the rest of the narrative. "What if nothing we do makes any sense?" he says. Think of that as the scriptwriter's equivalent of an ejector seat.

20/02/2009

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

You’ll need super powers to work out what’s going on.

22/02/2009

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