Franklyn

Franklyn

Franklyn is the tale of four characters in London and the futuristic Meanwhile City. Jonathan Preest is a masked vigilante who won’t stop until he finds his arch rival. Emilia is a defiant young art student whose path could be fatal. Milo is a broken-hearted young man searching for what it felt like to first be in love. Peter (Bernard Hill) is a very religious man who is scouring London and its homeless population for his missing son. Franklyn follows the interwoven fates of these four lost characters and a collision of two different universes. 2.5 out of 5 based on 15 reviews
Franklyn

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Sci-Fi / Fantasy
Director Gerald McMorrow
Cast Eva Green, Sam Riley, Bernard Hill Ryan Phillippe
Studio Contender Entertainment Group
Release Date February 2009
Running Time 98 minutes
 

Franklyn is the tale of four characters in London and the futuristic Meanwhile City. Jonathan Preest is a masked vigilante who won’t stop until he finds his arch rival. Emilia is a defiant young art student whose path could be fatal. Milo is a broken-hearted young man searching for what it felt like to first be in love. Peter (Bernard Hill) is a very religious man who is scouring London and its homeless population for his missing son. Franklyn follows the interwoven fates of these four lost characters and a collision of two different universes.

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Reviews

Channel 4 Film

Jon Fortgang

Packed into the film's fantastical aspect is a crush of ideas which the rest of Franklyn has to unpack. Finally there are more of these than the film can contain, the script skidding over intriguing speculations on suicide, delusion, conformity and loss.

23/04/2009

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The Mirror

Mark Adams

This bold and complex British fantasy-drama is an impressive debut for writerdirector Gerald McMorrow.

22/02/2009

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The Observer

Philip French

Franklyn is puzzling in a way some may think tiresome and others intriguing. Gerald McMorrow, whose first feature this is, has talent, but just as he starts tying up the loose ends, the film unravels.

01/03/2009

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Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

It’s not a flawless picture — some of the fantasy action suffers from wobbly choreography, and the backstory traumas which have warped the characters all turn out to be disappointingly textbook plot devices. However, it’s cannily cast and well acted

23/04/2009

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The Daily Express

Allan Hunter

Director Gerald McMorrow’s first feature is an imaginative but flawed attempt to meld a graphic novel fantasy with a story that is grounded in the traumas of real life.

27/02/2009

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The Times

Wendy Ide

It’s a convoluted piece of storytelling that repays more on a visual level than on a logical one. But you can’t fault its ambition and imagination.

26/02/2009

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The Sunday Times

Edward Porter

Franklyn is wonky and self-defeating: there are lots of gauche moments. Still, it’s entertaining, and commendable for its strangeness.

01/03/2009

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Total Film

Jonathan Dean

Frustrating. Not as clever as it thinks it is, but often far better looking than you’d expect.

20/02/2009

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Time Out

Nigel Floyd

Sadly, for much of the film, these threads feel more like loose ends than part of a developing narrative pattern. Still, ‘Franklyn’ has conceptual boldness and visual imagination that set it apart from the pack.

26/02/2009

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

It takes a quarter of the movie’s duration to start detecting its drift, another quarter to start caring. The fantastications have a stronger wallop than the realism. But the climax – better late than never – draws all together, stylistically as well as dramatically.

25/02/2009

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Gerald McMorrow is a first-time feature director whose ambitious interweaving of fantasy and reality is perhaps influenced by Donnie Darko or Pan's Labyrinth. He is aiming high. And yet, to use a recondite and specialist critical term, this film is massively up itself.

27/02/2009

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The Evening Standard

Derek Malcolm

McMorrow is clearly an intriguing and talented British director but Franklyn is almost impossible to follow, thus wasting the talents of the good cast trying their best to make sense of it.

26/02/2009

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The Scotsman

Mike McCahill

Character motivations are crushingly obvious, while the plot-linking finale is simultaneously over-blown and underwhelming.

27/02/2009

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

It's quite stylishly shot, but the effort of making sense of it all really wears you down, and the actors have to recite dialogue that only highlights its silliness and pomposity.

27/02/2009

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Variety

Derek Elley

A clever idea that could have worked as a novella, the urban-fantasy-cum-sci-fier “Franklyn” doesn’t cut it by the bigscreen rulebook.

21/10/2009

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