Let the Right One In (Låt Den Rätte Komma In)

Let the Right One In (Låt Den Rätte Komma In)

A fragile, anxious boy, 12-year-old Oskar is regularly bullied by his stronger classmates but never strikes back. The lonely boy's wish for a friend seems to come true when he meets Eli, also 12, who moves in next door to him with her father. A pale, serious young girl, she only comes out at night and doesn't seem affected by the freezing temperatures. Coinciding with Eli's arrival is a series of inexplicable disappearances and murders. One man is found tied to a tree, another frozen in the lake, a woman bitten in the neck. Blood seems to be the common denominator. But by now a subtle romance has blossomed between Oskar and Eli, and she gives him the strength to fight back against his aggressors. --©Magnolia Pictures. 4.1 out of 5 based on 16 reviews
Let the Right One In (Låt Den Rätte Komma In)

Omniscore:

Certificate 15
Genre Horror/Suspense, Foreign, Sci-Fi / Fantasy
Director Tomas Alfredson
Cast Lina Leandersson, Per Ragnar, Henrik Dahl Kåre Hedebrant
Studio Magnolia Pictures
Release Date April 2009
Running Time 114 minutes
 

A fragile, anxious boy, 12-year-old Oskar is regularly bullied by his stronger classmates but never strikes back. The lonely boy's wish for a friend seems to come true when he meets Eli, also 12, who moves in next door to him with her father. A pale, serious young girl, she only comes out at night and doesn't seem affected by the freezing temperatures. Coinciding with Eli's arrival is a series of inexplicable disappearances and murders. One man is found tied to a tree, another frozen in the lake, a woman bitten in the neck. Blood seems to be the common denominator. But by now a subtle romance has blossomed between Oskar and Eli, and she gives him the strength to fight back against his aggressors. --©Magnolia Pictures.

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Reviews

Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

At once a devastating, curiously uplifting inhuman drama and a superbly crafted genre exercise, Let The Right One In can stand toe-to-toe with Spirit Of The Beehive, Pan's Labyrinth or Orphee. See it.

07/11/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Sukhdev Sandhu

...beautiful to gaze at, achingly romantic, emotionally involving, unexpectedly terrifying.

09/04/2009

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Channel 4 Film

Anton Bitel

Beautifully shot, restrained in tone, moving yet utterly unsentimental, consummately performed, and showing a sympathy for its characters that extends even to bullies and cold-blooded killers, Let The Right One In transcends its generic confines, fusing the oldest kind of fury with an aching lyricism that seems entirely new.

07/11/2010

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The Times

Wendy Ide

But for all its languorous pacing, its mordant humour and the unexpectedly sweet-natured approach to the bonds that grow between the two children, Let the Right One In is underscored by an unsettling violence.

09/02/2009

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The Sunday Times

Peter Whittle

The film is a fresh and memorable mix of grimy realism and gothic fantasy.

12/04/2009

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Total Film

Kevin Harley

As cold as a corpse, as warm as love and thick with shady business in between, Alfredson’s chiller is moving and nerve-jangling. A vampire movie to nourish the heart, mind and fear glands.

26/03/2009

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Variety

Alissa Simon

A bullied misfit finds his destiny with a mysterious girl vampire in the idiosyncratic romantic horror-fantasy “Let the Right One in.” Calling to mind the work of Anne Rice and Stephen King, atmospheric adaptation of Swedish author John Ajvide Lindqvist’s bestseller is well directed by his countryman Tomas Alfredson (“Four Shades of Brown”) and should click with cult and arthouse auds.

09/02/2009

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The Guardian

Derek Malcolm

Alfredson’s editing style means that, on occasion, he won’t leave his sequences alone to expand naturally, and a certain choppiness results. All the same, he and his team have conjured up, from a remarkable piece of writing, one of the best, most imaginative and resonant vampire stories I’ve seen.

09/04/2009

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

Like so many of the movie's constituent elements, this is simply bizarre: part of a constellation of freakiness and fascination. Let the Right One In has invention and stamina, a rich arterial flow of fear.

10/04/2009

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Let the Right One In is unarguably concerned with the curse of vampirism, and a certain amount of bloodsucker lore is enacted before our startled gaze... Yet, while these sights are scary, and upsetting, they aren't at all sensational, for the film plays not as a harum-scarum horror but as a touching and weirdly chaste lo

10/04/2009

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

There are bursts of black comedy, and some ingeniously choreographed throat-biting which is all the more startling because it's used so sparingly. What lingers is the film's chilly air of melancholy and flickering hope, and the unsettling ambiguity over whether Oskar, having invited Eli into his life, has let the right one in or not.

12/04/2009

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

The film is a welcome change from the grisly excess and tired clichés of most modern horror films, and establishes a remarkably unsettling atmosphere of normality. Imagine a Ken Loach film gradually turning into Carrie.

09/04/2009

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The Mirror

Mark Adams

Forget Twilight or Buffy - here's a Swedish vampire movie that is mean, moody and magnificent.

05/04/2009

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The New Statesman

Ryan Gilbey

thoroughly distinctive and invigorating entertainment, albeit one that’s as calculated in its wooing of the misfit mindset as a Morrissey lyric, or The Catcher in the Rye.

09/04/2009

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The Observer

Phillip French

The second film, Let the Right One In, adapted by John Ajvide Lindqvist from his own remarkable novel and directed by Tomas Alfredson, is an altogether more sombre affair. It's a major addition to the vampire genre, in a setting closely resembling that of the first film by another gifted young Swede, Lukas Moodysson's Show Me Love (aka Fucking Åmål).

12/04/2009

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Time Out

David Jenkins

Tomas Alfredson’s light, subtle direction, combined with DoP Hoyte Van Hoytema’s crepuscular visuals, makes the courtship elements all the more tender and the staccato scenes of extreme violence all the more disturbing... Where the film falters is in its (arguably) reactionary final scenes.

09/04/2009

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