Red Riding Hood

Red Riding Hood

Valerie (Amanda Seyfried) is a beautiful young woman torn between two men. She is in love with a brooding outsider Peter (Shiloh Fernandez), but her parents have arranged for her to marry the wealthy Henry (Max Irons). Unwilling to lose each other, Valerie and Peter are planning to run away together when they learn that Valerie's older sister has been killed by the werewolf that prowls the dark forest surrounding their village. 1.8 out of 5 based on 14 reviews
Red Riding Hood

Omniscore:

Certificate 12A
Genre Sci-Fi / Fantasy, Romance
Director Catherine Hardwicke
Cast Shiloh Fernandez, Max Irons, Gary Oldman, Billy Burke, Virginia Madsen, Julie Christie Amanda Seyfried
Studio Warner Bros UK
Release Date April 2011
Running Time 100 mins
 

Valerie (Amanda Seyfried) is a beautiful young woman torn between two men. She is in love with a brooding outsider Peter (Shiloh Fernandez), but her parents have arranged for her to marry the wealthy Henry (Max Irons). Unwilling to lose each other, Valerie and Peter are planning to run away together when they learn that Valerie's older sister has been killed by the werewolf that prowls the dark forest surrounding their village.

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Reviews

Empire Magazine

Willian Thomas

By turns impish, flirty, scared and strong, she’s a great heroine, and Seyfried’s performance is bewitching. Trouble is, there’s very little that matches up to her passion.

20/04/2011

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Total Film

Ken McIntyre

Once you’ve abandoned all hope of seeing anything resembling the gothic horror promised by the marketing however, Red Riding Hood is actually a fun, goofy ride, albeit one lathered in chintz and froth.

11/04/2011

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The New York Times

Manohla Dargis

What sharp teeth Ms. Hardwicke doesn’t have: working from David Leslie Johnson’s screenplay she takes on the story’s grown-up themes of sex and death directly but weakly. This might be because the movie has been pitched at young adults, as evidenced by its pretty leads, electronic soundtrack, contemporary vibe and veneer, and caution.

10/03/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Tim Robey

Red Riding Hood should be campily entertaining but somehow isn’t, because Hardwicke becomes a more complacent stylist with each successive movie, and the whodunit twists are right out of Scooby-Doo.

14/04/2011

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Time Out

Trevor Johnston

Yes, there’s enough connection with the source’s underlying issues of repression and desire to give this reason to exist, but, boy, does Hardwicke labour in getting from fairy tale to would-be psycho-thriller. For a start, it’s hard to take any of this seriously.

14/04/2011

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

Red Riding Hood should be as irresistible as a great, trashy pop song; alas, it’s all pap and no pop. Seyfried looks like a blonde princess who has wandered into the wrong fairy tale. But then so have we, the audience.

17/04/2011

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The Financial Times

Leo Robson

A lacklustre tale of star-crossed lovers and a whodunit of staggering mediocrity.

13/04/2011

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The Los Angeles Times

Betsy Sharkey

Gorgeously shot, smartly conceived, cleverly cast, badly executed — the lush medieval beauty here is at best only skin deep. If this were a four-letter-word newspaper, you would see a string of them now.

11/04/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Barber

Twilight-aholics shouldn't be taken in. The mystery plot doesn't leave room for the love story, and Fernandez and Irons are less convincing than the CGI wolf.

17/04/2011

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The New Yorker

David Denby

We don’t care if she is devoured or winds up with one of the young men or spends all eternity rolling in the snow with the werewolf. Hardwicke and her editor employ the new shock syntax of horror films; the movie is all whoosh and whack and abrupt closeups. It’s an alienating experience, without emotional resonance or charm.

28/03/2011

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Acted out with this degree of  leaden angst, it is a painful, anachronistic bore.

20/04/2011

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The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

The "little" has been removed from the title, and director Catherine Hardwicke has put a pubertal spin on the old folk tale, removing its teeth, pedantically spelling out the lite-psychological implications, and populating it with high-cheekboned hotties smouldering in the twilight. They all yearningly brood and pout, especially the wolf, who is frankly an incredible drama queen.

14/03/2011

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The Independent

Anthony Quinn

Astonishingly awful.

15/04/2011

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The Times

Kate Muir

The werewolf is an outsize labradoodle, and Seyfried’s acting consists of ogling wildly, particularly when she says “What big eyes you have, Grandmama,” to a peering Julie Christie.

15/04/2011

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