The Raven

The Raven

The Raven is a fictionalized account of the final days of gothic writer Edgar Allan Poe as he tracks a serial killer whose crimes mirror works by the famous author. 1.9 out of 5 based on 12 reviews
The Raven

Omniscore:

Certificate
Genre Thriller
Director James McTeigue
Cast Luke Evans, Alice Eve, Brendan Gleeson, Oliver Jackson-Cohen John Cusack
Studio Universal Pictures UK
Release Date March 2012
Running Time 111 mins
 

The Raven is a fictionalized account of the final days of gothic writer Edgar Allan Poe as he tracks a serial killer whose crimes mirror works by the famous author.

Reviews

The Guardian

Peter Bradshaw

It's a nice touch to give Baltimore a serial killer over a century before Dr Hannibal Lecter was employed by the Johns Hopkins Medical Centre in that city. It runs out of steam in the final 10 minutes, but there's some gruesome drama and Cusack is on decent form.

08/03/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Jonathan Romney

he screenplay, by Hannah Shakespeare and Ben Livingston, is one of the better things here. There's much ripe dialogue, especially in the mouth of Poe, played by Cusack as a manic proto-hipster (with a snazzy goatee, rather than the real Poe's merely functional 'tache). His voice an impassioned rasp, his face usually fixed in wild-eyed bafflement, Cusack comes on like a true melodrama barnstormer – especially when ranting at all comers about his overlooked genius ... The rest, however, just fills in the gaps in a routine way ...

11/03/2012

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The Observer

Philip French

It's a moderately entertaining thriller that (contrary to the claims of its writers and director) throws little light on Poe's character and none on the mystery surrounding his death.

11/03/2012

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Screen

Mark Adams

Director James McTeigue favours bombastic direction and an unsuitable rock soundtrack though is not aided by a rather unfocussed script that seems to be aiming for a period version of Se7en but feels more like ‘CSI Baltimore’ circa 1849.

09/03/2012

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Empire Magazine

Kim Newman

From the first crashing chords of the disastrously inappropriate rock score to the frankly dumb punchline, this consistently misses the mark – mostly thanks to haphazard scriptwriting which suggests a wikipedia level of Poe scholarship and a failure to grasp the concept of the whodunit.

05/03/2012

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Time Out

Tom Huddleston

Take a dash of ‘Theatre of Blood’, a splash of Seven and a fistful of From Hell, give it a good shake, drain out all the juice and you’ve got The Raven a bizarre, deeply unsatisfying fictionalised account of the last days of Edgar Allan Poe.

06/03/2012

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The Times

Wendy Ide

McTeigue figures that periodically chucking a crow at the camera and shrouding the set in dry ice will do to create a Poe-ish atmosphere. But he’s just burying the film with baroque set dressing and manufactured tension.

09/03/2012

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Total Film

Neil Smith

As implausible as the stars’ gleaming choppers. Who knew they had such great dentistry in 1840s Baltimore?

05/03/2012

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The Sunday Times

Cosmo Landesman

There’s a downside of literary fame for you: being travestied in hack work such as this.

11/03/2012

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The Financial Times

Nigel Andrews

Poor Edgar Allan Poe. For years he groomed that personality-defining black moustache sitting like a mournful raven on his upper lip. Then along comes John Cusack in The Raven wearing a full-order goatee. Can’t Hollywood get anything right?

08/03/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Robbie Collin

Edgar Allan Poe’s acidic wit and flair for brevity are both in perilously short supply in this torpid, rackety whodunit.

08/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Chris Tookey

Cusack has been publicising the film with the revelation that he suffered dreadful sleeping problems while making it. No such difficulties are likely to be experienced by the audience. The title echoes Poe’s most famous poem - and the only sensible response is a horrified cry of ‘Nevermore!’

09/03/2012

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