Grief

Mike Leigh

Grief

Mike Leigh's new play deals, as one might expect, with intense, awkward and frustrating relationships. In the second half of the fifties, Dorothy, a war widow, has relocated with her daughter and the twin spectres of her absent husband and a changing world to her older brother's house in the suburbs. Together the three negotiate an anxious world of routine, ritual and repression. 3.6 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Grief

Omniscore:

Location South Bank
Venue National Theatre
Director Mike Leigh
Cast Marion Bailey, Sam Kelly, Wendy Nottingham Lesley Manville
From September 2011
Until October 2011
Box Office 0207452 3000
 

Mike Leigh's new play deals, as one might expect, with intense, awkward and frustrating relationships. In the second half of the fifties, Dorothy, a war widow, has relocated with her daughter and the twin spectres of her absent husband and a changing world to her older brother's house in the suburbs. Together the three negotiate an anxious world of routine, ritual and repression.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Kate Bassett

The household's quiet agonies are charted with acute delicacy. Everything is muted in Dorothy's taupe, carpeted living room in a way that's deliberately undramatic yet intense, making you hypersensitive to the merest flicker of stifled emotion... Extraordinarily poignant.

24/09/2007

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The Stage

Michael Coveney

Taut, tight and brilliantly controlled... I don’t think Leigh has ever produced work quite as tense and concentrated as Grief

21/09/2007

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Be warned: brilliant though it often is, Grief casts a potent pall of desolation that lingers long after the show itself is over.

21/09/2007

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Time Out

Caroline McGinn

Each tight performance is the tip of an entire mysterious life. When the two hours of gradual revelation is up, you wish you could rewind and rewatch.

25/09/2007

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

Meticulously evocative

22/09/2007

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The Times

Libby Purves

As to plot, well, nobody gets more truthful performances from actors than Mike Leigh, but few have less regard for storytelling. When it all ends grimly, you always knew it would.

21/09/2007

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szalwinska

Exquisitely observed, profoundly quiet

24/09/2007

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The Observer

Kate Kellaway

At the end, although the two hours have been absorbing, occasionally poignant and sometimes hilarious with flashes of Leigh's unique magic – one is left unsurprised and dry-eyed, unable to share in anyone's grief.

24/09/2007

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

[Leigh's] vision of domestic wretchedness is profound, even if in the end it isn't heartrending.

21/09/2007

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

While it doesn't disappoint in its exploration of the hermetic strangeness of English family life, it lacks the richness of texture of Leigh's finest work for stage and film.

21/09/2007

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