Pentecost

David Edgar

Pentecost

David Edgar's dazzling and witty play of ideas concerning language, post soviet Eastern European cultural identity, displacement, the refugee experience and the value of art. 3.0 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Pentecost

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue St Leonard's Church, Shoreditch
Director Gavin McAlinden
Cast Pinar Ogun, Jonathan Sidgwick, Ben Warwick
From March 2012
Until April 2012
Box Office 07401 641120
 

David Edgar's dazzling and witty play of ideas concerning language, post soviet Eastern European cultural identity, displacement, the refugee experience and the value of art.

Reviews

The Stage

Gerald Berkowitz

A large international cast whose babel of accents nicely serves the playwright’s thematic fascination with languages ... all carrying the play’s weight of exposition and art history with absolute clarity while conveying both the excitement of intellectual discovery and the passionate conviction that matters of art, culture and national identity do matter.

16/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Daisy Bowie-Sell

While the place itself brings a lot to the production, the church’s acoustics are occasionally an obstruction and often the intricacies of Edgar’s arguments are lost in the battle to hear all the lines. The leads are generally strong ... but the rest of the company struggle at times with relaying the nuances of this richly enjoyable script.

20/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Times

Dominic Maxwell

Though it doesn’t entirely hang together, this a fascinating try.

21/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Jane Edwardes

The combination of those accents and the difficult acoustics means that the words come and go like a weak radio signal, making it practically impossible to follow Edgar’s complex ideas about the value of culture and the rise of nationalism.

25/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

Edgar startles the life out of us by turning the play into a hostage drama. It’s a terrifically tough gear shift to pull off, and as a result the second half of Gavin McAlinden’s production loses both momentum and focus. Talking of focus, it is vital that we click into the play’s rhythm straight away. If not, crucial — not to mention lengthy — early expositions on the importance of the artwork are in danger of passing by undigested, ensuring mounting bewilderment.

16/03/2012

Read Full Review


The Observer

Killian Fox

Depending on your view, the play is dazzlingly ambitious or fatally over-egged.

18/03/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore