Boys

Ella Hickson

Boys

It’s finals day for the Class of 2011. Benny, Mack, Timp and Cam are due out of their five bedroom flat tomorrow morning; five bedrooms, five chairs, four boys – and one hell of a party. Stepping into a world that doesn’t want them, these boys start to wonder whether there’s any point in getting any older. How will they find the fight to make it as adults? Tonight marks the end of an era. It’s hot. And there’ll be girls. Predict a riot. 3.6 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
Boys

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Soho Theatre
Director Robert Icke
Cast Danny Kirrane, Lorn Macdonald, Tom Mothersdale, Alison O'Donnell, Eve Ponsonby, Samuel Edward Cook
From May 2012
Until June 2012
Box Office 020 7478 0100
 

It’s finals day for the Class of 2011. Benny, Mack, Timp and Cam are due out of their five bedroom flat tomorrow morning; five bedrooms, five chairs, four boys – and one hell of a party. Stepping into a world that doesn’t want them, these boys start to wonder whether there’s any point in getting any older. How will they find the fight to make it as adults? Tonight marks the end of an era. It’s hot. And there’ll be girls. Predict a riot.

Reviews

The Independent

Paul Taylor

Tensions rise in a play that both powerfully captures the mood of a generation and addresses permanent truths with exhilarating flair.

09/06/2012

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The Stage

Natasha Tripney

Hickson excels at writing monologues and there are some potent stand-alone speeches. Robert Icke’s production invests the play with an increasing sense of queasiness and menace. There are forces in the world outside their control and they can either join the crowd or take a stand - or ignore it all and get off their faces. Tensions build slowly, secrets creep to the surface and then spill forth on waves of tequila and pills.

01/06/2012

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Time Out

Honour Bayes

Boys will be boys. Not since 'Men Behaving Badly' has a situation comedy so delighted in the old adage. Ella Hickson's Boys is as funny as the ITV/BBC kidult classic. But it is also a wounded look at a generation who feel the world owes them and know it isn't going to deliver; a plea for old heroic values in a society run by villains.

01/06/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

Hickson nimbly picks out the conflicting feelings and explores the impact on the current generation of a chilly economic climate. But this is a good play and goes further than topicality, suggesting something more universal and less tangible: that poignant self-awareness that sometimes strikes at crucial moments in life.

03/06/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

It is reminiscent of Brucker's 1928 The Pains of Youth, and its high-achieving but despairing medical students, one of whom opines that life is only a disappointment after the age of 17. For this contemporary generation time is running out, too; for some of them, it already has. The single chair spotlit amid the rubbish is a reminder of this in Robert Icke's production, which delivers fearless performances from its young cast.

04/06/2012

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

What Hickson captures well is the anxiety that lurks beneath the hedonism. Will there be jobs, even for those with good degrees? Will they be able to afford their own homes? Will adult responsibilities seem dull compared with the feral excesses of youth? Probing a range of moral and practical concerns, Hickson’s writing bubbles with ideas and nice insights. But the desire to make big statements occasionally results in clunkiness, and the structure is disjointed

01/06/2012

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The Times

Dominic Maxwell

Invigorating, and brilliantly played: The Young Ones reborn as tragicomedy.

07/06/2012

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