A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen (Simon Stephens)

A Doll's House

The moment the love of your life starts to fade. The moment everything you value falls to pieces. The moment Nora discovers that her life is a lie. 3.9 out of 5 based on 9 reviews
A Doll's House

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Young Vic
Director Carrie Cracknell
Cast Hattie Morahan, Nick Fletcher, Yolanda Kettle, Dominic Rowan, Steve Toussaint, Lynne Verrall, Susannah Wise
From June 2012
Until July 2012
Box Office 020 7922 2922
 

The moment the love of your life starts to fade. The moment everything you value falls to pieces. The moment Nora discovers that her life is a lie.

Reviews

The Observer

Susannah Clapp

When Carrie Cracknell was in (joint) charge of the Gate in Notting Hill, she specialised in blending dance with drama. She brings that skill to her mesmerising A Doll's House, which has an utterly distinctive rhythm, a constantly changing tempo. It floats. Hattie Morahan's marvellous Nora seems to be wafted uncontrollably from one place and person to another, from playing the doll to being the creature who finds herself slamming the door on husband and children.

15/07/2012

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

Simon Stephens’s new rendering of the play doesn’t insist on giving it a flashy makeover. Instead it is respectful of Ibsen’s formal power ... Better still is Ian MacNeil’s design, which evokes both a busy domesticity and something much less comfortable. It makes the Helmers’ home seem just like a doll’s house, a claustrophobic place from which any right-minded person would want to break free.

10/07/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

Of course women now have greater equality in western society, but the play’s questioning of the roles couples can adopt in relationships still seems pertinent, and its examination of the corrosive effect of debt is, if you will pardon the pun, bang on the money.

10/07/2012

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The Daily Mail

Quentin Letts

Tragedy it is, despite odd giggles from a puerile Young Vic audience last night. Perhaps the laughter is healthy evidence of the playwright’s objectivity or the slightly excessive modernity of Simon Stephens’s text. Or perhaps it is just duff direction by Carrie Cracknell, failing to build a sense of the ominous.

10/07/2012

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The Stage

Ben Dowell

Any production is of course carried by its Nora and the dazzlingly versatile Hattie Morahan rises triumphantly to the task. She is utterly magnetic, childlike in her telling of little lies, lively, witty, warm and sparkly. She is also amusing, but the laughs run deeper, reminding us that this play walks a knife-edge of different registers. Even in her most tragic moments Morahan teases out the potential for laughs and even farcical absurdity. Not that her Nora isn’t pitiable as she deals with the private prison her secrets and lies are creating for her before she realises that her real jailer is her husband.

10/07/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Dominic Cavendish

Hattie Morahan’s wonderfully luminous and sinuous Nora isn’t required to strap on a dildo or reach for a kitchen-knife in pursuit of some radical point. Instead, in Carrie Cracknell’s fantastically assured production, which gives the 19th-century Norwegian action an airy, suburban flavour, this banker’s wife is a conventional creature in stylish ankle-length dress brought to the precipice of an impossible choice one crisis-wracked Christmas.

10/07/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

It is said that Nora’s final slam of the door echoed down the feminist decades, but human nature doesn’t date. Nor do themes of secret debt, anxiety over jobs, small desperate dishonesties and Ibsen’s huge and humane truths about the fragility of shallow role-playing. There is laughter, too, when tension meets absurdity. Terrific.

11/07/2012

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

Who is the star in this production of Ibsen’s 19th-century masterpiece of conjugal collapse? It’s a toss-up between Hattie Morahan’s Nora and a revolving stage. The director, Carrie Cracknell, keeps spinning the Helmers’ dinky home like a roundabout, allowing us glimpses of hush-hush meetings and generating a sense of queasy foreboding.

15/07/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

Morahan presents us with a Nora who exists from the start in a state of barely controlled hysteria. But, in its commanding detail, Morahan's performance is entirely her own. She reacts with reflex excitement to every mention of the word "money", maintains a hopelessly idealistic view of her husband, Torvald ... This is a bravura performance that elevates Morahan to the front rank of British actors. Although Simon Stephens's new version tilts the balance even further against Torvald by depriving him of his potentially redemptive last line, Dominic Rowan is still extremely impressive.

10/07/2012

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