Sex With A Stranger

Stefan Golaszewski

Sex With A Stranger

Adam snubs his girlfriend Ruth, and leaves her at home while he goes out for a mate's birthday. Later that evening he picks up Grace at a club and gets the nightbus back to hers. Bleak, funny and excruciatingly accurate Golaszewski's play locates the place where three lives - with all that has gone before, and all is yet to happen - entwine in a cheerless morass of uncertainly, boredom, loneliness and empty lust. 3.6 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
Sex With A Stranger

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Trafalgar Studios
Director Philip Breen
Cast Jamie Winstone, Naomi Sheldon Russel Tovey
From February 2012
Until February 2012
Box Office 0845 505 8500
 

Adam snubs his girlfriend Ruth, and leaves her at home while he goes out for a mate's birthday. Later that evening he picks up Grace at a club and gets the nightbus back to hers. Bleak, funny and excruciatingly accurate Golaszewski's play locates the place where three lives - with all that has gone before, and all is yet to happen - entwine in a cheerless morass of uncertainly, boredom, loneliness and empty lust.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

Although the material is slight, it's eerily well observed and shrewdly woven together.

07/02/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Artistically subtle, with its clever, non-linear time scheme ... There is a sense of ice at this play’s heart, and one leaves it with a shiver.

07/02/2012

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The Independent

Paul Taylor

You can't put an ironing board on stage without invoking Look Back in Anger. Here, though, it's a case of John Osborne, eat your heart out, as we watch, in weirdly rapt and respectful silence, a young woman named Ruth perform the entire business of ironing her partner's package-creased new shirt.

07/02/2012

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The Observer

Tom Lamont

It starts to feel like an over-extended sketch about the ritual of one-night stands when the story suddenly broadens into something knottier, more sinister. Is that really a genial vacancy in Adam's manner or a deeper misanthropy?

12/02/2012

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The Stage

Ben Dowell

It’s unpleasant, sad, dreary, hilarious and never less than painfully plausible. The writer hovers over each awful nugget of small talk and awkward silence, constantly fascinated by ordinariness.

07/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Jonathan Dean

Anything but simple, saddled with a time-jumping narrative that favours gimmicks over fleshing out its characters.

12/02/2012

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The Times

Dominic Maxwell

Stage time is dominated by the banality, frustration and pre-coital rigamarole that most such stories skate over. I’m not convinced that the conceit quite sustains all of its 80 minutes ... But Golaszewski’s smart structure and sharp eye and Phillip Breen’s beautifully acted production ensure that those boring bits are never actually boring.

08/02/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

All one can say is that Golaszewski, for a male dramatist, shows a rare understanding of female distress.

07/02/2012

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