The Great Gatsby

Peter Joucla

The Great Gatsby

Published in 1925, four years before the catastrophic collapse of the American stock markets, Fitzgerald’s novel graphically portrays a society being destroyed by money and dishonesty, an American Dream of happiness and individualism degenerating into the mere pursuit of wealth. 3.3 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Great Gatsby

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Wilton's Music Hall
Director Peter Joucla
Cast Kirsty Besterman, Michael Malarkey Nick Chambers
From April 2012
Until May 2012
Box Office 020 7702 2789
 

Published in 1925, four years before the catastrophic collapse of the American stock markets, Fitzgerald’s novel graphically portrays a society being destroyed by money and dishonesty, an American Dream of happiness and individualism degenerating into the mere pursuit of wealth.

Reviews

The Times

Jeremy Kingston

Joucla’s adaptation captures the essence of Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel with unceasing zest, achieved not just by choosing when to convert narrative into dialogue but by incorporating songs between the scenes. Even within them. A chorus is always hovering on the fringes of the action, but if the actors playing the main characters are not in a scene they will join the chorus and sing Happy Days Are Here Again, and many another song that catches that sense of the period’s bright denial and frantic joy. Joucla has certainly delved deep into the music of the time.

26/04/2012

Read Full Review


The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

It’s not just an ace speakeasy with quite a nice play attached, though, as Peter Joucla’s surprisingly clear-eyed adaptation cuts to the heart of Fitzgerald’s text while preserving a very decent amount of it. A book so reliant on a narrator, and such a sharp narrator as Nick Carraway (Nick Chambers), does perforce, present staging issues but Joucla surmounts them. One major quibble would be that the full extent of Gatsby’s empty secret isn’t revealed.

27/04/2012

Read Full Review


The Stage

Paul Vale

Joucla’s adaptation suffers badly from a lack of complexity, with none of the central relationships gathering enough weight to make them even remotely believable. There are however some strong performances throughout that go some way to making up this shortfall, particularly from Nick Chambers as newcomer Nick Carraway and Vicki Campbell as self-assured professional golfer, Jordan Baker.

26/04/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Dominic Cavendish

I’ve never seen such a swell-looking crowd: the girls dolled up in flapper-age finery, the boys got up like tyro tycoons. They should hand out prizes for the best-dressed couple, to add to the Prohibition-themed cocktails they’re shaking at the bar. This is a show that majors in fun; and it’s no surprise to see it’s a cult hit – who isn’t seeking a spot of stylish, well-heeled hedonism in these glum times? It’s highly likely, though, that you’ll remember the ecstatic looks on the faces of those volunteering for a crash-course in the Charleston during the interval more than any of the theatrical action itself.

02/05/2012

Read Full Review


Time Out

Honour Bayes

What Peter Joucla's adaptation possess in style it lacks in heart. For all its entertaining charm this is a lightweight adaptation of Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece. Neither Daisy's betrayal, nor Nick's faithfulness to Gatsby are made real.

30/04/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

The exquisite Victorian music hall may not be the most appropriate fit for Long Island, but its rackety charm works its magic – before the show and in the interval. It is the building and the peripherals that are the stars here, making Peter Joucia's awkward staging of his own limp version of the narrative seem like an afterthought, an inconsequential sideshow to the drinking and dancing, the chance to dress up and take photos. Perhaps that's the point and it is our own 21st-century pursuit of pleasure, a mirror of Gatsby's gaudy parties, that is under the microscope here. If so, it doesn't come off.

30/04/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore