Love Love Love

Mike Bartlett

Love Love Love

A fiery relationship is sparked in the haze of the 60s, and charred by today’s brutal realities. From passion to paranoia, Love, Love, Love takes on the baby boomer generation as it retires, and finds it full of trouble. 4.1 out of 5 based on 10 reviews
Love Love Love

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Royal Court
Director James Grieve
Cast Victoria Hamilton, Ben Miles, George Rainsford, Sam Troughton Claire Foy
From April 2012
Until June 2012
Box Office 020 7565 5000
 

A fiery relationship is sparked in the haze of the 60s, and charred by today’s brutal realities. From passion to paranoia, Love, Love, Love takes on the baby boomer generation as it retires, and finds it full of trouble.

Reviews

The Daily Mail

Quentin Letts

‘Love, love, love,’ sing The Beatles, as the babyboomer adults (who never grew up) embark on another episode of self-absorption, leaving the next generation once again to clear up the mess.

04/05/2012

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The Observer

Susannah Clapp

Love, Love, Love, which has an edge of personal conviction and droll, lightly-worn despair, sparkles.

06/05/2012

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The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

It is the superb Hamilton and Miles, who over the course of nearly three hours have to portray both teenagers and characters in their sixties, who make the most telling impression. Hamilton appears especially to relish the blithe awfulness of Sandra. But plaudits also go to Bartlett, who leaves us thinking that love, despite its rewards, definitely isn’t all you need.

04/05/2012

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The Financial Times

Sarah Hemming

So Mike Bartlett, in this scorching comedy, focuses on the generational shift in fortunes and the oft-repeated charge that the baby-boomers pulled up the ladder behind them. It’s a play that inevitably raises more questions than it answers, but it is ambitious and hugely amusing. And while Bartlett might simplify issues himself, what he demonstrates with great flair is how every generation simplifies the faults of the previous one.

07/05/2012

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The Guardian

Michael Billington

As a survivor of the 60s, I think Bartlett is unfair to a decade that saw Britain become a better, more tolerant place: capital punishment was abolished, homosexuality decriminalised and racial discrimination outlawed. But he offers a wholly persuasive portrait of a couple who typify some of the less attractive aspects of the period, including its naivety and narcissism.

04/05/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Wow, this one packs a punch. In a theatre famous for encouraging angry young men, Mike Bartlett, a writer in his early thirties, lands some knock-out blows on the complacency and selfishness of the have-it-all baby- boomer generation ... this is a play that has you laughing uproariously at one moment and wincing painfully the next.

04/05/2012

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Time Out

Caroline McGinn

Victoria Hamilton is its star ... She and Ben Miles's Ken are a suburban Taylor and Burton - their love hurts everyone around them but it heats up the stage. Bartlett exaggerates the damage they do to their children, probably to compensate for their charisma, but Rosie's critique of her parents sounds didactic and dull despite its accuracy.

04/05/2012

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The Times

Libby Purves

No trite conclusion softens the magnificently cynical ending. Bartlett has traced the awful parabola in which have-it-all free spirits of the Sixties become irritably acquisitive and inept parents, then a 60-plus generation replacing pot and festivals with golf and cruises. Still determined to keep it all. Ouch!

06/05/2012

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The Sunday Times

Jane Edwardes

An entertaining ride, even if this baby-boomer is not convinced by Bartlett’s thesis.

13/05/2012

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The Stage

Aleks Sierz

Bartlett’s play balances a concern for big issues with a deep regard for the individual characters. Assessing the material successes of her parents’ generation, Rose blames them for the fact that her friends typically live in worse accommodation, have less-good jobs and poorer prospects. It’s partly a social comment, partly a cry of individual resentment.

04/05/2012

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