Cornelius

JB Priestly

Cornelius

As bankruptcy looms, the ever-optimistic Jim Cornelius, partner at import firm Briggs and Murrison, is fighting to keep his creditors happy and his spirits up. Tensions rise with the arrival of Judy, the beautiful, young typist who shows Cornelius the life he could have led... Written for Ralph Richardson in 1935, Priestley observes the politics and tensions of daily office life with searing wit and humanity in this hilarious and heart-breaking story of friendship, unrequited love and business. 4.0 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Cornelius

Omniscore:

Location London
Venue Finborough Theatre
Director Sam Yates
Cast David Ellis, Annabel Topham, Col Farrell, Alan Cox, Andrew Fallaize, Emily Barber, Jamie Newall Beverley Klein
From August 2012
Until September 2012
Box Office 0844 847 1652
 

As bankruptcy looms, the ever-optimistic Jim Cornelius, partner at import firm Briggs and Murrison, is fighting to keep his creditors happy and his spirits up. Tensions rise with the arrival of Judy, the beautiful, young typist who shows Cornelius the life he could have led... Written for Ralph Richardson in 1935, Priestley observes the politics and tensions of daily office life with searing wit and humanity in this hilarious and heart-breaking story of friendship, unrequited love and business.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

A timely bulletin from an age so like our own.

22/08/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Michael Billington

Even if Priestley occasionally lapses into cliche, as in his portrait of the desiccated secretary nursing a hopeless passion for the widowed hero, he provides a combative state-of-the-nation play at a time when British drama was filled with gossamer-light escapism.

20/08/2012

Read Full Review


The Stage

Catherine Usher

As one of the company’s partners, Alan Cox is charismatic and effervescent as Cornelius, a man much keener on making merry than he is on balancing books. Just as he is the type of person you would want to entertain you all day at your desk, he is also the type of character that brings a play to life, and Cox’s display of exuberance and charm is as remarkable as it is welcome.

17/08/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Dominic Cavendish

Just when you think Priestley is starting to clock-watch and crowd-please, he shifts into a proto-Pinteresque vein with the nick-of-time return of Murrison, now a paranoid shadow of his former self. The spectre of suicide darkens the second half only to be redeemed by a stroke so delicate and truthful that you leave convinced you’ve glimpsed forgotten genius at work.

28/08/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

Everyone in this play has their own modest yearnings, and the director, Sam Yates, takes them seriously.

02/09/2012

Read Full Review


The Independent

Paul Taylor

The play never hardens into a socialist tract because Priestley is so adept at finding a saving eccentricity in people it would be easy to patronise as victimised dullards ... True, there are stereotypes here but when his unappeased yearning for Emily Barber's disarmingly pretty and plain-speaking typist triggers Vanya-esque feelings of futility in Cornelius, there is also a sub-Chekhovian sense of concurrent light-and-dark emotions as a window is opened onto the sound of the independent and therefore liberating laughter of strangers.

29/08/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore