Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare

Merchant of Venice

Shakespeare's Venice is transplanted to Vegas, another city built on business, where mobsters and gamblers risk everything on deals that can make a fortune or destroy them utterly. When Antonio bets on a venture that fails to repay, he is forced to borrow money from a man he despises. But debts must be repaid. When cultures clash, a business deal turns to revenge and a wronged father seeks a deadly retribution. 3.8 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
Merchant of Venice

Omniscore:

Location Stratford-upon-Avon
Venue Royal Shakespeare Theatre
Director Rupert Gould
Cast Caroline Martin, Scott Handy, Susannah Fielding Patrick Stewart
From May 2011
Until October 2011
Box Office 0844 800 1110  
 

Shakespeare's Venice is transplanted to Vegas, another city built on business, where mobsters and gamblers risk everything on deals that can make a fortune or destroy them utterly. When Antonio bets on a venture that fails to repay, he is forced to borrow money from a man he despises. But debts must be repaid. When cultures clash, a business deal turns to revenge and a wronged father seeks a deadly retribution.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Henry Hitchings

Rupert Goold’s dazzling production makes The Merchant of Venice feel unfamiliar: it reinvents Shakespeare’s troublesome tragicomedy as a piercingly satirical vision of the modern addiction to alternative realities and capricious debauchery... [its] visual lushness and dynamic humour are sure to appeal to younger audiences. They may madden purists, but will gladden all who see Goold’s chutzpah as a breath of fresh air.

23/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Ian Shuttleworth

With Stewart as his Shylock in Stratford, [Goold] is back to a full complement of bells and whistles – though not, alas, of coherence... This is one-third of a magnificent production and another two hours that are mostly great fun but signify nothing.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Michael Billington

Rupert Goold, as is his wont, goes for broke by transporting [the production] wholesale to modern Las Vegas, where showbiz fantasy meets speculative capitalism; and the result is, by turns, brilliant, outrageous and excessive... It becomes a vision of the American nightmare... And, although Goold’s production is bound to cause argument, Las Vegas seems a perfect metaphor for a world of financial and romantic fantasy.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Observer

Susannah Clapp

Rupert Goold’s voracious, vivacious production of The Merchant of Venice is so non-stop and on-the-go that you might think the verse would get buried. Far from it... This glitter and flash gives one of Shakespeare’s most wretched plays some moments of unaccustomed buoyancy

22/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Times

Libby Purves

Rupert Goold’s determination to conflate modern casino capitalism and the old Rialto knows no bounds... [it] leaves you shocked, untriumphant, tearful for [Shylock]. It’s magnificent. The result is an evening of extreme entertainment laced with moral horror.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The New Statesman

Andrew Billen

The production, then, is not only glamorous, it is also very clever. But can it get over the play's central problem for post-Holocaust audiences: what to do with the anti-Semitic victimisation of the unpleasant Shylock? Goold does not have to impose anything here, beyond Patrick Stewart, whose triumph this night is as great as his director's.

18/07/2011

Read Full Review


The Stage

Alistair Smith

The production will divide audiences, but is undoubtedly vital and on occasion inspired.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Charles Spencer

Poor Patrick Stewart seems to inhabit an entirely different production from the rest of the cast, giving us a sombre and increasingly frail Jew which is intermittently impressive in its own right but seems to have little to do with the gaudy excesses of the rest of the show... after more than three hours it begins to seem false and hollow — just like Las Vegas itself.

20/05/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore