Mary Shelley

Helen Edmundson

Mary Shelley

Shared Experience brings to life the astonishing tale of Mary Shelley - and how she came to write one of the greatest stories ever told, aged just 19. This powerful new play explores Shelley's remarkable life: her controversial philosopher father, her scandalous elopement aged 16 and how she wrote a novel, so radical in its ideology, that in 1817 she changed the literary landscape forever. 3.2 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Mary Shelley

Omniscore:

Location Leeds
Venue West Yorkshire Playhouse
Director Polly Teale
Cast William Chubb, Ben Lamb, Flora Nicholson, Sadie Shimmin, Shannon Tarbet Kristin Atherton
From March 2012
Until April 2012
Box Office 0113 213 7700
 

Shared Experience brings to life the astonishing tale of Mary Shelley - and how she came to write one of the greatest stories ever told, aged just 19. This powerful new play explores Shelley's remarkable life: her controversial philosopher father, her scandalous elopement aged 16 and how she wrote a novel, so radical in its ideology, that in 1817 she changed the literary landscape forever.

Reviews

The Observer

Kate Kellaway

Mary Shelley ... had a life almost too eventful to be contained within a play. By the end of the evening there's a Shakespearean body count: Mary and Percy's baby daughter dies; Fanny, Mary's half-sister, commits suicide and so does Shelley's first wife, Harriet. It's plucky to cram all this in and at the same time try to establish the intellectual reach of Mary's father, William Godwin.

25/03/2012

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The Stage

Natasha Tripney

The now-familiar Shared Experience physicality is used only sparingly, though there is some potent doubling of Mary’s half-sister, Fanny, with the girls’ late mother, Mary Wollstonecraft ... Edmundson is, however, most interested in exploring the emotional consequences of Mary’s eventual estrangement from her father, and how, through his character and beliefs, he was to help shape her creative vision.

22/03/2012

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The Times

Dominic Maxwell

Without ever reducing Mary Shelley to an issue drama, Edmundson suggests the destructive nature of a life lived without compromise. She notes the impact of blindly following your heart; in the young lovers’ idealism but also in Godwin’s high-minded rejection of his daughter after her elopement ... And if such ideas can’t always retain dramatic vitality in a lengthy, three-act show, Polly Teale’s production is well acted and beautifully staged.

23/03/2012

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

Helen Edmundson’s script, with its roundelay of bed-hopping, suicides and premature deaths, weighs up the cost of the Romantics’ insatiable quest for new experiences and ways of living. But it never claws into darker, more lyrical territory or provides great insight into what forged Frankenstein.

01/04/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

Along the way, there are some interesting issues about compromise, raising daughters, sisterhood, and how making brave choices for yourself can limit the choices for others. It's an entertaining enough evening that's played with real commitment by its cast ... But unlike Mary, it never fulfils its early promise.

23/03/2012

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