Morning

Simon Stephens

Morning

The end of summer. Two friends about to go their separate ways. But they will always share that one moment. A moment changed them forever. 4.0 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Morning

Omniscore:

Location Edinburgh
Venue Traverse
Director Sean Holmes
Cast .
From August 2012
Until August 2012
Box Office 0131 228 1404
 

The end of summer. Two friends about to go their separate ways. But they will always share that one moment. A moment changed them forever.

In London from 5 September

Reviews

Time Out

Time Out

Sean Holmes offers a masterclass in playful malevolence and Brechtian absurdity, like one of his brilliant comedy productions for Filter gone over to the dark side ... If it’s more stylishly visceral than actively profound, but this production’s impact is ferocious.

14/08/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

It's always clear that what we are watching is a play, a Brechtian one with bleeding edges, and it uncannily depicts young people who gaze out on the world with the uncompromising stare of scientists examining an interesting problem, only to discover that they are the subject under the microscope. The performances by the young cast are terrifyingly good, in part because they are so unvarnished. They know how to perform, but also how to just be on stage. Many adult actors could learn from them.

06/08/2012

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The Independent

Alice Jones

Stephens workshopped his “play for young people” with actors from the Lyric Hammersmith’s Young Company. While a little thin in parts, its power comes from its absolute authenticity. Sean Holmes has drawn out remarkable, raw performances from his cast, with Scarlet Billham darkly glittering as the disturbed Stephanie.

08/08/2012

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The Sunday Times

Maxie Szakwinska

Has a devious nonchalance.

12/08/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Dominic Cavendish

In plumbing the depths of adolescent insecurity and modern amorality, giving it a controversial feminine slant, [Stephens] makes you sit up and watch. But absorbed though I was by his portrait of a possessive 17-year-old suffering from a deadly lack of empathy, and undisguised ego-centrism, I felt he had produced an interesting experimental piece that conveniently and cleverly saves itself the bother of trying to make you care about the characters.

06/08/2012

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