Mies Julie

August Strindberg (Yael Farber)

Mies Julie

The South African-born and internationally acclaimed director Yael Farber sets her explosive new adaptation of Strindberg’s classic Miss Julie in the remote, bleak beauty of the eastern Cape Karoo. The visceral struggles of contemporary South Africa are laid bare in this domestic setting, as John and Mies Julie spiral one night, in a deadly battle over power, sexuality, memory, mothers and land. 5.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Mies Julie

Omniscore:

Location Edinburgh Fringe Festival
Venue Assembly Mound
Director Yael Farber
Cast Hilda Cronjé, Thokozile Ntshinga
From August 2012
Until August 2012
Box Office 0131 623 3030
 

The South African-born and internationally acclaimed director Yael Farber sets her explosive new adaptation of Strindberg’s classic Miss Julie in the remote, bleak beauty of the eastern Cape Karoo. The visceral struggles of contemporary South Africa are laid bare in this domestic setting, as John and Mies Julie spiral one night, in a deadly battle over power, sexuality, memory, mothers and land.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

A primal scream of a reworking of the Strindberg staple set in modern South Africa’s Eastern Cape Karoo. It’s a pitch-perfect repositioning of the action from adaptor/director Yael Farber, who brings to visceral life the complex, simmering racial and linguistic mix in this far-flung corner of an immensely uneasy “rainbow nation”.

08/08/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

Strindberg's 1888 drama was a shocker for its excavation of class and gender – and in 1985, during apartheid, a South African production featuring a cross-race kiss caused national controversy. Farber moves the play – and the debate – on, presenting John and Julie as children so damaged by the past that it is impossible for them to forge any relationship in the present.

08/08/2012

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The Times

Robert Dawson Scott

Now, of course, in post-apartheid, post-Mandela South Africa, it’s all very different, as the races co-exist happily alongside one another. Like hell they do. Farber confronts head-on the generations of rape and pillage, cruelty and betrayal, and, perhaps above all, the grotesque economic imbalances that still come between this Julie and her John.

14/08/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Dominic Cavendish

The production’s success doesn’t simply rest, though, on what, in other less capable hands, might simply be a set of racial casting decisions or confrontational visual tactics. Farber, who comes from Johannesburg, though is now partially resident in Canada, makes land and the restitution of land – currently a burning issue in her home country – the beating heart of the show, entwining physical yearning with the body politic, ancestral cries with corporeal demands.

16/08/2012

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