And No More Shall We Part

Tom Holloway

And No More Shall We Part

Tom Holloway’s beautiful new play is an uplifting testament to the power of love and the indomitability of the human spirit. Don and Pam have lived together most of their lives, the kids have grown up and moved on but now, suddenly, she wants to leave him - or that's how it seems to him at least. Tom Holloway’s beautiful new play looks at what happens to a relationship when death comes into the room. Theatre without a safety net; bold, brave and simple. 3.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
And No More Shall We Part

Omniscore:

Location Edinburgh Fringe Festival
Venue Traverse
Director James Macdonald
Cast Bill Paterson Dearbhla Molloy
From August 2012
Until August 2012
Box Office 0131 228 1404
 

Tom Holloway’s beautiful new play is an uplifting testament to the power of love and the indomitability of the human spirit. Don and Pam have lived together most of their lives, the kids have grown up and moved on but now, suddenly, she wants to leave him - or that's how it seems to him at least. Tom Holloway’s beautiful new play looks at what happens to a relationship when death comes into the room. Theatre without a safety net; bold, brave and simple.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Fiona Mountford

The always wonderful Paterson lets us into the heart of Don’s grief, anger and plain bewilderment that this seemingly mundane evening spells the “last” of everything.

06/08/2012

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The Guardian

Lyn Gardner

It is directed at a funereal pace and with a warm glow of soft-focus reverence by James Macdonald – clearly designed to tug at the heart strings. It does that job efficiently enough, but there is something inert about this calculated weepie in its construction and the writing, which never burrows deeply enough into Pam and Don's relationship to bring it fully alive. In some ways, you might argue that the play is a testament to our inability to discuss death without packaging it up in a pretty theatrical box with low-level lighting.

08/08/2012

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